Law, Decision-Making, and Microcomputers: Cross-National Perspectives

By Stuart S. Nagel | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
Microcomputers, Decision-Making,
and Case Evaluation
Richard Graham
JURY VERDICT RESEARCH--THE COMPANY
For three decades, Jury Verdict Research (JVR) has maintained a database of personal injury verdicts that are statistically analyzed by injury, liability, and region. The company was founded in 1959 when a Cleveland attorney, Philip J. Hermann, noting the similarities in jury verdict patterns, discerned the need for legal research that identified probabilities for plaintiff recovery and injury values rendered for similar cases. It has been convincingly demonstrated that when faced with similar facts of economic loss and injury, juries render awards that are amazingly consistent. This pattern of predictability is called actuarial fact and is the principle of the JVR evaluation process.1JVR's research methodology was developed by Hans Zeisel and Harry Kalven, Jr., at the University of Chicago School of Law and by Dr. Barritone of Case Western Reserve University. Essentially the method involves accepted and proven formulae of statistical analysis coupled with regression analysis and data reduction to the normal curve.The nucleus of research activity within JVR is the database. Initiated in 1959, the database has been constantly appended until, at present, approximately 2,000 verdicts per month are added to this repository of personal injury verdict data. Drawing upon the wealth of information available, which encompasses all fifty states and the District of Columbia, the research staff provides inclusive assistance to clients in four broad study areas:
1. Liability situations
2. Injury claims and evaluations

-67-

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