Male Homosexual Behavior and the Effects of AIDS Education: A Study of Behavior and Safer Sex in New Zealand and South Australia

By B. R. Simon Rosser | Go to book overview

active men. As a consequence, Chapter 15 reports on how AIDS interventions designed specifically for homosexually active men affect their perceptions of risk, while Chapter 16 investigates the effects of these interventions on sexual behavior. As well as investigating the effects of education targeting the gay community, the effects of a general public AIDS education campaign on homosexual behavior is important. Thus Chapter 17 describes the effect of the Grim Reaper campaign on the safer sex behavior of the SA sample.


NOTES
1
From Nga Tama a Rangi (The sons of heaven), a manuscript recounting pre-European Maori mythology written by Wii Maihi Te Rangi-Kaheke of the Ngatti-Rangi-wewehi tribe [ Te Rangi-Kaheke, 1849].
2
In Maori, the North Island -- the more populated of NZ's (Aoteoroa's) two major islands -- is called Te Ika a Maaui (the fish of Maaui).
3
Literally, he was aborted.
4
The AIDS Support Network was the vanguard of the New Zealand AIDS Foundation and concentrated mainly on support for people with AIDS and education to the gay community. (Complementary programs and public education campaigns for exclusively heterosexually active people were also later developed.)
5
See Figures 14.1-14.4 for illustrations of these strategies. These figures are taken from NZ and Australian posters concerning AIDS and safer sex.
6
The controversy surrounding the use of explicit materials (language and visual media) to educate the public on STDs is not new. As noted in Chapter 17, the explicit nature of US and NZ educational interventions in World War I stirred a similar highly emotional debate.
7
It should be noted that the principle of eroticizing a product in order to promote it is not new, having been a standard advertising ploy to sell everything from used cars to soft drinks. Only two aspects of this education differed from the traditional advertising: male, not female, models were used, and sex, for once, was used to promote sex, as distinct from toothpaste or some other irrelevant (for sexual purposes) commercial product.
8
By "reactionary," I mean they arose in response to the overwhelming and urgent need to educate homosexually active men about safer sex and thus were loosely based on models of health education developed from research on other behaviors or from guesswork and first principles (for example, educators asking such questions as, "Would this program help convince me to practice safer sex?"). It should be acknowledged that the Grim Reaper campaign examined in Chapter 17 was not a community-based campaign. Rather, it was developed by an advertising agency, commissioned by the [Australian] National Advisory Committee on AIDS.
9
Thus Chapter 16 compares two programs of American origin.
10
Even though latency may be the only variable separating these communities, the experience of homosexually active men within areas of high AIDS/HIV prevalence and low HIV/AIDS prevalence are clearly different. In an area such as the Castro in San Francisco, where the majority of homosexually active men are estimated to be HIV antibody positive, the major issues become ones of welfare, support, grief overload, survival, etc. In areas of low HIV prevalence, the prime objective must concern the halting of HIV transmission.

-166-

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