Prospects for Recovery and Sustainable Development in Africa

By Aguibou Y. Yansané | Go to book overview

problems resulting from the reduction in the number of public sector employees). Yet self-sustaining growth may not be attained unless the reform program is pursued to its end and concessional financing continue to support, over the foreseeable future, the public investments and balance of payments of one of the most dilapidated economies of West Africa, but also one of the richest in potential. Although Côte d'Ivoire and Senegal seem to be experiencing some limitations of export-led growth and import substitution, Guinea still has a long way to go to be at this stage of exhaustion of extroverted growth. Perhaps Guinea can learn lessons to avoid the pitfalls of development of its historic neighbors, while the problem of growth and development is still total.


NOTES
1
Edmar Bacha, "IMF Conditionality: Conceptual Problems and Policy Alternatives," World Development 15, no. 12 ( December 1987), 1457- 1467; Bela Balassa , "Structural Adjustment Policies in Developing Economies," World Development 10, no. 1 ( 1982), 28-38; Sidney Dell, "Stabilization: The Political Economy of Overkill," in Charles Wilber, ed. The Political Economy of Development and Underdevelopment ( New York: Random House, 1984), 146-168; Gerald Helleiner, "Stabilization, Adjustment, and the Poor," World Development 15, no. 2 ( December 1987), 1499- 1513; Paul Kennedy, "African Businessmen and Foreign Capital: Collaboration or Conflict?" African Affairs 76 ( 1977), 177-194; Tony Killick, G. Bird, J. Sharpley, and M. Sutton, The IMF and Stabilization ( London: Heinemann, 1984); Jon Kraus, "The Political Economy of Food in Ghana," in Naomi Chazan and Timothy Shaw, eds. Coping with Africa's Food Crisis ( Boulder, Colo.: Lynne Rienner, 1988), 75-118; Carol Lancaster and John Williamson, eds. Africa Debt and Financing ( Washington, D.C.: Institute for International Economics, 1986); Peter Laurence, ed. World Recession and the Food Crisis in Africa ( London and Boulder, Colo.: James Currey and Westview Press, 1986); John Loxley, The IMF and the Poorest Countries ( Ottawa: North-South Institute, 1984); Joan Nelson, "The Political Economy of Stabilization: Commitment, Capacity and Public Response," World Development 12, no. 10 ( October 1984), 983-1006; Steve Weissman, "Structural Adjustment in Africa: Insights from the Experiences of Ghana and Senegal: Report of Staff Study Mission," Committee on Foreign Affairs, U.S. House of Representatives ( March 1989); World Bank, Africa's Adjustment and Growth in the 1980s ( Washington, D.C.: World Bank, 1989); Gilles Durufle, "Structural Disequilibria and Adjustment Policies in the Ivory Coast," in Bonnie K. Campbell and John Loxley, eds. Structural Adjustment in Africa ( London: The Macmillan Press Limited, 1989), 42- 137; Gilles Durufle, "Evaluating Structural Adjustment Policies for Senegal," in Bonnie K. Campbell ed. Political Dimensions of the International Debt Crisis ( London: The Macmillan Press Limited, 1989), 92-129.
2
The specific strategies to accomplish targeted growth rates, industrialization, and international assistance are import substitution, export promotion, and basic human needs approach.

For other explanations of Africa's development crisis, see Organization of African Unity, The Lagos Plan for the Economic Development of Africa 1980- 2000 ( Geneva:

-121-

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