Prospects for Recovery and Sustainable Development in Africa

By Aguibou Y. Yansané | Go to book overview

sweeteners, and palm oil is being rejected in the West because of its alleged high chloresterol content. In short, Africa remains highly vulnerable so long as it depends on exports to finance the purchase of its needs rather than producing for itself the things which it requires. Furthermore, the General Agreement on Trade and Tariffs ( GATT) negotiations to the contrary notwithstanding, the emergence of the European Community, of the North American Free Trade Agreement ( NAFTA), and of Japan's growing linkages with East Asia, are indications that the world may be splitting into regional trading blocs far faster than we realize.

If the foregoing is true, where do the fifty-one uncoordinated African states fit into this new trading configuration? Do fifty-one poor, tiny, individualistic sovereignties have a future in tomorrow's world? I think not. And for that reason I am dismayed that SA, Chapter 3 rather than development strategy Chapter 2 of the UNECA report, is attracting most of the world's attention. Africa has it right when it calls for a program of collective self-reliance -- a concept that Dr. Du Bois and Kwame Nkrumah chose to call Pan-Africanism. The concept may have been premature then. The harsh economic realities of today suggest that it should be Africa's top priority now.


NOTES
1
United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA), African Alternative Framework to Structural Adjustment Programmes for Socio-Economic Recovery and Transformation ( Addis Ababa: ECA, 1989).
2
World Bank, Sub-Saharan Africa from Crisis to Sustainable Growth ( Washington, D.C.: World Bank, 1989).
3
World Bank, Africa's Adjustment and Growth in the 1980s ( Washington, D.C.: World Bank, 1989).
4
UNECA, African Alternative Framework.
5
Organization of African Unity, Lagos Plan of Action for the Economic Development of Africa 1980-2000 ( Addis Ababa: OAU, 1980).
6
World Bank, Accelerated Development in Sub-Saharan Africa ( Washington, D.C.: World Bank, 1981).

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