Historical Dictionary of School Segregation and Desegregation: The American Experience

By Jeffrey A. Raffel | Go to book overview

I

INDEX OF DISSIMILARITY. Also called the Taeuber Index after Karl and Alma Taeuber, who popularized its use (although it was developed by Otis and Beverly Duncan); a measure of racial balance,* originally used to measure housing desegregation,* indicating the proportion of either white or black students who would have to change schools in order to achieve the exact same percentage in each subarea as in the whole area. If all schools were perfectly racially balanced, the index would be 0. If all whites attended schools enrolling only whites and blacks only schools enrolling blacks, the index would be 100. The index uses as the standard the overall racial composition of an area and then compares the racial composition of subareas to the racial composition of the entire area. Specifically, if in each subarea I there are w(I) whites and b(I) blacks and the entire area contains W whites and B blacks, the index would be

D = [1/2 Σ | b(I)/B - w(I)/W |] x 100

"D is equal to one-half the sum of the absolute value of the number of blacks in each school divided by the total number of blacks in the district minus the number of whites in each school divided by the total number of whites in the district, multiplied by 100. The index represents the percentage of black students who would have to be reassigned to white schools, if no whites are reassigned, in order to have the same proportion of blacks in each school in the entire district" ( Fife, 1992:17). This is a measure of racial imbalance* and thus is used in conjunction with the racial balance definition of school desegregation.*

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Historical Dictionary of School Segregation and Desegregation: The American Experience
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xiii
  • Chronology xxiii
  • A 1
  • B 18
  • C 46
  • D 73
  • E 90
  • F 104
  • G 111
  • H 116
  • I 128
  • J 133
  • K 137
  • L 144
  • M 149
  • N 176
  • O 188
  • P 195
  • R 205
  • S 223
  • T 252
  • U 256
  • V 268
  • W 270
  • Y 285
  • Bibliographical Essay 287
  • General Bibliography 293
  • Geographical Bibliography 303
  • Index 317
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