God, Britain, and Hitler in World War II: The View of the British Clergy, 1939-1945

By A. J. Hoover | Go to book overview

Foreword

Richard V. Pierard

World War II was the most extensive conflict in human history. Never before had so many nations in so many parts of the world engaged in a struggle of such titanic proportions. Neither had the loss of life and property as the result of a war ever been greater. It changed the entire course of global development by bringing an end to European imperial and economic hegemony and ushering in the age of American dominance. Thereafter conflicts were more limited in scope, and even the struggle between communism (in its various forms) and Western democracy never erupted into a global war, which in the nuclear age would have meant the total destruction of humanity.

No other topic is the subject of so much scholarly and popular literature as this one. The two-volume Handbook of Literature and Research on World War II, edited by Loyd E. Lee and published by Greenwood Press in 1997 and 1998, provides the best overview of the scholarship on the conflict available today, but it is inconceivable that anyone will ever produce a bibliography encompassing all the millions of relevant literary works that have appeared in various languages. Still, the unceasing flow of books, articles, films, videos, and other materials on World War II bears testimony to the continuing grip it has on the public.

Although a torrent of literature has been produced on the military, political, and social aspects of the war, writers have devoted much less attention to its

-xi-

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God, Britain, and Hitler in World War II: The View of the British Clergy, 1939-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction: The Legacy of the Great War 1
  • Notes 5
  • Chapter 2 - 1939: War Again? 7
  • Notes 20
  • Chapter 3 - Dealing with Pacifism 23
  • Notes 46
  • Chapter 4 - The Enemy: Fascism-Nazism 51
  • Notes 74
  • Chapter 5 - The Decline and Fall of Liberal Humanism 79
  • Notes 95
  • Chapter 6 - The War for Christian Civilization 97
  • Notes 117
  • Chapter 7 - 1945: A New Order? 121
  • Notes 132
  • Chapter 8 - Reflections 135
  • Notes 137
  • Selected Bibliography 139
  • Index 145
  • About the Author *
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