Adoption and Financial Assistance: Tools for Navigating the Bureaucracy

By Rita Laws; Tim O'Hanlon | Go to book overview

Preface
When it comes to special needs adoption and money, the authors want the reader to know several things right up front:
Nothing in this book should be used as a substitute for the counsel of an attorney in an adoption assistance court action. Parents should seek legal advice from a qualified adoption-assistance-experienced attorney.
Regardless of parental income, and thanks to PIQ 92-02, it is almost never too late to seek adoption assistance and retroactive payments.
The federal government has committed the money to make special needs adoption affordable for all Americans who want to get a child out of foster care for good. However, accessing these funds is not easy or simple. When it comes to financial requests that are in the best interests of adopted children, parents should never take no for an answer--at first.
Parents who believe they have not been dealt with fairly have options in a process called the fair hearing, and hiring legal help is not required for this informal type of appeal.
The state adoption bureaucracy is not impossible to understand.
Adoption assistance payments and service subsidies make special needs adoption possible for millions of families and thousands of waiting children. Permanency is better for children than foster care because adoption creates productive citizens. In the long run, even subsidized adoptions save the taxpayer money. Parents who advocate financially for their children are not just helping their children and their families, they are making a stronger nation.
In writing this book, we drew on research, personal experience, and the experience gained assisting thousands of other families. One of the authors of this book is an adoptive parent and advocate, and the other is an adoption advocate and

-xi-

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