Congressional Intent

By Thomas B. Curtis; Donald L. Westerfield et al. | Go to book overview

thus necessitating a little help from lobbyists to pressure mavericks in Congress not to stray to the Republican side of the issue.

In the next chapter, we will look at the will of the House. Neo- Machiavellians say that obtaining a consensus in a body so diverse as 435 members takes negotiation, "tail twisting," and persuasion to almost unbelievable dimensions--yet it is done. The question is, "What are the social and ethical costs of consensus not obtained through facts and fair argument?"


NOTES
1.
W. Goldsmith, The Growth of Presidential Power: A Documented History, 3 vols. ( New York: Chelsea House, 1974). See also Dwight Eisenhower, Mandate for Change, 1953-56 ( New York: New American Library, 1963); R. Evans and R. Novak, Lyndon B. Johnson: The Exercise of Power ( New York: The New American Library, 1966); R. Evans and R. Novak, Nixon in the White House: The Frustration of Power ( New York: Random House, 1971); F. Freidel, Franklin D. Roosevelt: The Apprenticeship ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1952); P. Light , The President's Agenda: Domestic Policy Choice from Kennedy to Carter ( Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1983); L. Lynn Jr., and D. Whitman , The President as Policy-Maker: Jimmy Carter and Welfare Reform ( Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1981), just to name a few.
2.
J. Barber, The Presidential Character: Predicting Performance in the White House (Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1982), p. vii.
3.
T. Cronin, The State of the Presidency ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1975), p. 7.
4.
G. Allison, The Essence of Decision. Explaining the Cuban Missile Crisis ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1971); I. Destier, Presidents, Bureaucrats and Foreign Policy: The Politics of Organizational Reform (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1972); H. Finer, The Presidency: Crisis and Regeneration ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1960).
5.
His "approval" ratings were in the mid-nineties, higher than for any president at a similar time in office.
6.
S. Milkins and M. Nelson, The American Presidency: Origins and Development, 1776-1990 ( Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly 1990), p. 42. See also C. Thach Jr., The Creation of the Presidency, 1775-1789 ( Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1969); G. Wood, The Creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1969); C. Collier and J. Collier, Decision in Philadelphia: The Constitutional Convention of 1787 ( New York: Ballantine, 1986); C. Rossiter, The Grand Convention ( London: MacGibbon and Kee, 1968).

-42-

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Congressional Intent
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures and Tables xi
  • Foreword xiii
  • Preface xvii
  • Part I- Study and Deliberation 1
  • 1- Prologue 3
  • Notes 6
  • 2- Study and Deliberation In Congress 9
  • Notes 28
  • 3- Congress and the Presidents 31
  • Notes 42
  • 4- The Will of the House 45
  • Notes 60
  • 5- Committees: House Of Representatives 63
  • Notes 77
  • Part II- Undermining the Study and Deliberative Process 79
  • 6- Executive Strategies 81
  • Notes 92
  • 7- The Germaneness Issue 95
  • Notes 108
  • 8- Committee and Rules Strategies 111
  • Notes 120
  • Part III- The Public Interest 123
  • 9- Special Interest And Lobbyist Agenda 125
  • Notes 131
  • 10- Blueprint for Reform 133
  • EPILOGUE 140
  • Notes 141
  • Bibliography 143
  • Index 159
  • About the Authors 169
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