Political Economy, Ideology, and the Impact of Economics on the Third World

By Derrick K. Gondwe | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I am indebted to many friends who have contributed to the making of this book both directly and indirectly. Among those who made direct contributions, I must first thank Professor Lloyd Hogan, who gave me the initial impetus to start seriously thinking about writing something along the lines suggested in this book. I am also grateful to Professor Robert Heilbroner, who encouraged me to put my thoughts on paper, and to Mr. William W. Keefer, the former president of Warner Electric Brake and Clutch Company of Beloit, Wisconsin, who spurred me on to finish it. Without the encouragement I received from these three people I may not have taken the plunge when I did. Professor Hogan and Mr. Keefer also read through earlier drafts of the manuscript and suggested changes which have been incorporated into the book. Other friends and colleagues who have made significant contributions after reading earlier drafts of this manuscript include; Professors Kelfala Kallon, Lee M. Siegel, Robert M. Gemmill, George B. Ayitteh, Joseph Horton, Derek Ray, Winifred Armstrong, and one of my ex-students, Jindra Cekan. I thank the students in my political economy classes, of whom there are too many to mention individually, but who were subjected to reading and commenting on different parts of this manuscript. Many thanks to Betty Smith, who took pains to go over the manuscript for typographical errors. I further extend my gratitude to my editor, Andrew Schub, at Greenwood Publishing, who found mistakes that I did not even know existed, and generally made the final product more readable.

-vii-

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Political Economy, Ideology, and the Impact of Economics on the Third World
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Transition from Political Economy to Economics 11
  • 3 - Ideology in Political Economy 31
  • 5 - Economics and the Political Economy of Less Developed Countries 93
  • Notes 115
  • 6 - Ideology and the Economics of Less Developed Countries 121
  • 7 - Toward a People-Centered Political Economy 151
  • Bibliography 177
  • Index 189
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