Clara Barton: In the Service of Humanity

By David H. Burton | Go to book overview

3
Travels and Travail

When in the late summer of 1869 Clara Barton took ship for the Old World, leaving her native land for the first time. She was going to places known to her but in song and story. She had little if any knowledge of conditions then obtaining in Europe, conditions that were to belie her peaceful expectations. The world of the nineteenth century was dominated by the leading European powers, with neoimperialism soon to be in full swing. At the same time relations of the various Continental nations at home were coming under increasing strain. If Great Britain enjoyed a splendid isolation, aloof for the most part from growing national rivalries, France and the German states were facing each other with a fear and hostility that were of one piece. Long the European kingpin before and after the rise and fall of Napoleon Bonaparte, French hegemony was about to be challenged by the German states that themselves were seeking to overcome a centuries-long delay in unification. German nationalism, aroused by Napoleonic invasion and Napoleonic defeat, had nonetheless been elusive. Only by mid-nineteenth century had Prussia begun to emerge as the single German state likely to provide the leadership required to transform the Germanies into a German nation. By victory in the Seven Weeks War of 1866 Prussia swept aside Austrian pretensions to a commanding place in German affairs. Four years later Prussia with the support of several other princedoms used the Franco-Prussian War

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Clara Barton: In the Service of Humanity
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Women's Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Years to Womanhood 1
  • 2 - Battlefield Commission 25
  • 3 - Travels and Travail 65
  • 4 - A New Beginning 81
  • 5 - The Red Cross: What It Became 99
  • 6 - Road to Rejection 139
  • 7 - Last Years, Last Words 159
  • Bibliography 167
  • Index 171
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 176

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.