Clara Barton: In the Service of Humanity

By David H. Burton | Go to book overview

5
The Red Cross: What It
Became

Clara Barton was the founder of the American Red Cross. She was also the architect--the design would be what she wanted it to be--and its builder--she would provide the leadership and not merely the inspiration required to carry out the tasks that by nature and by nations were set before her. In 1882 the Red Cross was largely a paper organization with a promise of achievement. For the next twenty years Barton labored to fulfill the promise, and in the event she exceeded expectations rather much as she had done all her life.

The problems facing the newly born society were serious in nature. It had no working organization. At this stage Clara Barton was the Red Cross and the Red Cross was Clara Barton. Headquarters in Washington were located in the residence Barton had purchased in 1878, a row house at 947 T Street in the northwest quadrant of the city. There were only three local chapters, all in New York state, at Dansville, Rochester, and Syracuse, though others would soon come into being. Further, the society had no operating funds and slim prospects that financial support would be forthcoming. The idea that the Congress would appropriate even a modest annual stipend was far-fetched. For a society with national pretensions based on international recognition, extended on June 9, 1882, there were good reasons to doubt, not its survival perhaps, but certainly its great success. The Blue Anchor, for example, was busy as ever collecting money from

-99-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Clara Barton: In the Service of Humanity
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Women's Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Years to Womanhood 1
  • 2 - Battlefield Commission 25
  • 3 - Travels and Travail 65
  • 4 - A New Beginning 81
  • 5 - The Red Cross: What It Became 99
  • 6 - Road to Rejection 139
  • 7 - Last Years, Last Words 159
  • Bibliography 167
  • Index 171
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 176

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.