Dictionary of the Black Theatre: Broadway, Off-Broadway, and Selected Harlem Theatre

By Allen Woll | Go to book overview

Kongi for his mercy. Critics found some weaknesses in the play, but, nevertheless, found the evening dazzling. Jack Kroll, Newsweek's critic, spoke for the majority: "Under Michael A. Schultz, the large cast performs the juicy, chockablock, work with a splendid variety of drives, rhythms, styles, and savors. Douglas Turner Ward is superb as Danlola."

KWAMINA ( Fifty-fourth Street, October 23, 1961, 32 p.). Producer: Alfred de Liagre, Jr. Composer and lyricist: Richard Adler. Book: Robert Alan Aurthur. Director: Robert Lewis.

Cast: Brock Peters* (Obitsebi), Robert Guillaume* (Ako), Sally Ann Howes (Eve), Norman Barrs (Blair), Ethel Ayler (Naii), Joseph Attles (Akufo), Terry Carter (Kwamina), Ainsley Sigmond (Kojo), Rex Ingram* (Nana Mwalla), Rosalie Maxwell (Alla), Lillian Hayman (Mammy Trader), Ronald Platts, Edward Thomas (Policemen).

Songs: The Cocoa Bean Song; Welcome Home; The Sun Is Beginning to Crow; Did You Hear That?; You're As English As; Seven Sheep, Four Red Shirts, and a Bottle of Gin; Nothing More to Look Forward To; What's Wrong with Me?; Something Big; Ordinary People; A Man Can Have No Choice; What Happened to Me Tonight?; One Wife; Another Time, Another Place.

Although Kwamina had only a brief run, it received plaudits for its portrayal of the conflict between old and new in a West African locale. One of the two musicals of the season to deal with an interracial love affair ( No Strings was the other), Kwamina presented a talented black cast which, according to The New York Times, gave it a "mood of incantation and promise." Terry Carter, Brock Peters, Ethel Ayler, Robert Guillaume, and Broadway veteran Rex Ingram received raves for their performances.


L

LAGRIMA DEL DIABLO (St. Marks, January 10, 1980, 30 p.). Producer: Negro Ensemble Company.* Author: Dan Owens. Director: Richard Gant.

Cast: Leon Morenzie (Dacius Soulimare), Graham Brown (Archbishop Stephen Emmanuel Pontiflax), Adolph Caesar* (Aquilo), Barbara Montgomery* (Belin), Chuck Patterson (Captain), Charles Brown (Soldier I), Zackie Taylor (Soldier II).

Lagrima del Diablo ("The Devil's Tear") presents a dialogue between a guerrilla leader ( Leon Morenzie) and his captive, the archbishop ( Graham Brown) of a mythical country. The guerrilla tries to convince the archbishop to support the revolution, but he refuses to cooperate. At first, each claims

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Dictionary of the Black Theatre: Broadway, Off-Broadway, and Selected Harlem Theatre
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Notes xi
  • INTRODUCTION: A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE BLACK THEATRE xiii
  • Part 1: THE SHOWS 1
  • A 3
  • B 11
  • B 49
  • E 57
  • F 72
  • G 90
  • H 94
  • H 96
  • H 122
  • H 142
  • H 163
  • H 173
  • H 179
  • H 181
  • Part II: PERSONALITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS 183
  • A 185
  • B 186
  • C 193
  • D 199
  • D 202
  • D 203
  • G 209
  • H 212
  • I 220
  • J 221
  • K 227
  • K 229
  • K 230
  • N 238
  • O 240
  • P 240
  • P 242
  • P 246
  • P 250
  • P 252
  • W 253
  • Appendix I: A CHRONOLOGY OF THE BLACK THEATRE 267
  • Appendix II: A DISCOGRAPHY OF THE BLACK THEATRE 279
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 281
  • NAME INDEX 289
  • PLAY AND FILM INDEX 326
  • SONG INDEX 338
  • NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS 357
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