Dictionary of the Black Theatre: Broadway, Off-Broadway, and Selected Harlem Theatre

By Allen Woll | Go to book overview

experience, using the black idiom and experimenting with form, often with brilliant results. Her special focus has been the joy and pain of being a black woman; her special vision is to conjoin poetry and theatre on her terms. Her works often tremble with memorable lines of intense beauty and pain. In the space of approximately five years, the stage literature of Ntozake Shange has earned her a respected position not only in black theatre but in world theatre as well.

References: Early James, "Interview with Ntozake Shange," in Juliette Bowles, ed., In Memory and Spirit of Frances, Zora, and Lorraine: Essay and interviews on Black Women and Writing, Washington, D.C.: Institute for the Arts and the Humanities, Howard University, 1979, 23-26; Jordon June, "Shange Talks the Real Stuff," The Dial ( February 1982), 11-13; Miller E. Ethelbert, "For Zake--Who Dances the Bomba," New Directions: The Howard University Magazine ( April 1980), 29-31; Miller Jeanne-Marie A., "Black Women Playwrights from Grimké to Shange," in Gloria T. Hull, Patricia Bell Scott, and Barbara Smith, eds., But Some of Us Are Brave, Old Westbury, N.Y.: Feminist Press, 1982, 280-296; Shange Ntozake , Three Pieces, New York: St. Martin's Press, 1981.

JEANNE-MARIE A. MILLER

SISSLE, NOBLE. See BLAKE, EUBIE, and NOBLE SISSLE.

SMITH, J. AUGUSTUS ( 1891-1950). Smith combines as many names as talents. Known alternately as Gus Smith, J. A. Smith, and Augustus Smith, this actor-playwright-director played a major role in the Federal Theatre Project* during the 1930s. This Florida-born actor toured with the Rabbit's Foot Minstrels and later appeared in a silent film version of Uncle Tom's Cabin. He wrote and directed two plays during the 1930s, Louisiana* ( 1933) and Turpentine* ( 1936). He also directed The Case of Philip Lawrence* ( 1937) and Conjur Man Dies* ( 1936, with Joseph Losey).

Credits (Acting): Walk Together Chillun* ( 1936); On Whitman Avenue* ( 1946); A Long Way from Home; Grandma's Diary ( 1948).

Reference: " J. Augustus Smith" File, NYPL/TC.


T

TAYLOR, CLARICE ( 1927- ). Taylor moved from her Virginia home to New York City where she became an early member of the American Negro Theatre.* She made her acting debut with the group as "Sophie Slow" in On Striver's Row* in 1942. After several years on Broadway, she joined the Negro Ensemble Company.* She later won Broadway audiences as "Addaperle" in The Wiz* in 1975.

-250-

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Dictionary of the Black Theatre: Broadway, Off-Broadway, and Selected Harlem Theatre
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Notes xi
  • INTRODUCTION: A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE BLACK THEATRE xiii
  • Part 1: THE SHOWS 1
  • A 3
  • B 11
  • B 49
  • E 57
  • F 72
  • G 90
  • H 94
  • H 96
  • H 122
  • H 142
  • H 163
  • H 173
  • H 179
  • H 181
  • Part II: PERSONALITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS 183
  • A 185
  • B 186
  • C 193
  • D 199
  • D 202
  • D 203
  • G 209
  • H 212
  • I 220
  • J 221
  • K 227
  • K 229
  • K 230
  • N 238
  • O 240
  • P 240
  • P 242
  • P 246
  • P 250
  • P 252
  • W 253
  • Appendix I: A CHRONOLOGY OF THE BLACK THEATRE 267
  • Appendix II: A DISCOGRAPHY OF THE BLACK THEATRE 279
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 281
  • NAME INDEX 289
  • PLAY AND FILM INDEX 326
  • SONG INDEX 338
  • NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS 357
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