The Eagle and the Peacock: U.S. Foreign Policy toward India since Independence

By M. Srinivas Chary | Go to book overview

Rightly or wrongly many of them gained the impression that the United States was going to liberate them from British rule. When this hope was not realized Indians were bitterly disappointed and in many cases not only decided to question the United States' "sincerity" as a democratic nation, but began to class the United States with Britain as an imperialist power. 76

What was the legacy of the 1946 Indian famine and how was it a chrysalis for U.S.-Indian relations? The Cold War was not exactly in full form but the battle lines were hardening. American policy at this time was undergoing a transition from anti-trade bloc philosophy to anticolonial and anti-Soviet outlook. The United States was not yet appealing to Indians on issues of military security but only on economic development concerns.

The U.S. support for the French in Indochina and the Dutch in Indonesia confirmed to Indians their suspicions about the American role in Asia. Many Indians felt that the Truman administration was applying a double standard in its ready willingness to help Western Europe compared to its recalcitrance to provide food relief to India. For the Communists in India the United States became a whipping boy to drum support. Under these circumstances it was not surprising that most Indians saw the Truman response to India's food crisis as the result of Anglo-American food politics and were critical of the American efforts to avert the famine.

The Truman administration did not see any paradox in its policy, nor was it able to understand properly the problems and hence the behavior of a Third World nation such as India. In an astonishingly diverse and complex world, the United States leadership was unable to predict the total effect of its actions on its interests in South Asia. But the U.S. government retained the desire to draw on Indian resources and support for the Cold War containment policy in Asia in the coming years.


NOTES
1
In November 1945, the CIO-AFL War Relief Committee voted $100,000 for famine relief in India. See CIO War Relief News December 1943 ( New York: CIO, 1943), 2. The American Friends Service Committee, a Quaker agency, raised $100,000 for its activities in India through an organization known as the India Famine Relief Committee. See the New York Times, 7 December 1943. Another group called American Relief for India consisting of Rufus M. Jones, William Phillips, and Sumner Welles opened a campaign in 1945 to collect $1.2 million for relief activities in India; see American Relief for India ( New York:American Relief for India, Inc., 1945), 2.
2
Allen J. Matusow, Farm Policies and Politics in the Truman Years ( Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1967); Henry Chalmers, World Trade Policies ( Berkeley, Calif.: UCLA, 1953).
3
For the literature dealing with America's use of economic power, see Adolf A. Berle Jr.

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Eagle and the Peacock: U.S. Foreign Policy toward India since Independence
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 7
  • 1 - Laying the Foundation: Anglo-American Competition and Indian Freedom 9
  • Notes 19
  • 2 - Confronting Turbulent India: Truman and the Indian Famine of 1946 23
  • Notes 33
  • 3 - The Quest for Commerce, Peace, and Prosperity: Truman's Point Four, Mutual Security, and the Grain Deal of 1951 39
  • Notes 50
  • 4 - The Nationalist Challenge: Indian Nonalignment and Indo-American Conflicts 57
  • Notes 67
  • 5 - The End of Optimism: Cold War Comes to South Asia 71
  • Notes 85
  • 6 - Confrontation to Collaboration: U.S.-Pakistan Military Alliance, Trade, and Aid to India 93
  • Notes 107
  • 7 - Promise Fulfilled: The New Frontier, Kennedy, Johnson, and India 113
  • Notes 127
  • 8 - The Limits of Power: The Nixon and Indira Gandhi Challenges 131
  • Notes 142
  • 9 - Principled Pragmatism: Carter, Human Rights, and Indo-American Relations 147
  • Notes 155
  • 10 - Conservative Pragmatism: Reagan and India 159
  • Notes 170
  • Conclusion 173
  • Notes 178
  • Selected Bibliography 179
  • Index 189
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 194

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.