Planning for the Nation's Health: A Study of Twentieth-Century Developments in the United States

By Grace Budrys | Go to book overview

3
The Effects of Health Planning over Time

In considering the aftermath of the measures instituted to upgrade the quality of medical care available early in this century, it is important to recognize that the solution selected, and the locus of responsibility for implementing it, stayed in place for more than four decades. By contrast, during the second half of the twentieth century the definition of the problem, the solutions selected to address problems, as well as the locus of control and responsibility for resolving problems have gone through several revisions over the last three decades. The question suggested by this observation is either: Why did the first phase last as long as it did? Or, why are the more recent phases so short-lived? From one perspective, the answer to the question is obvious -- the rate at which social changes were occurring was accelerating during these years. From another perspective, the answer is more complicated. It rests on understanding the effects that were produced as a result of the measures adopted to address the problems identified in the first phase of health planning.

The reason for the stability of the first phase can be attributed to the fact that society was reasonably satisfied during that period or, at minimum, not sufficiently dissatisfied to turn its attention from other social concerns to the problem of health care delivery. In order to explicate this line of reasoning, it is necessary to return to the Flexner era.


THE EFFECTS OF THE PURSUIT OF QUALITY

The Flexner Report made explicit to anyone who was interested the standard against which all medical schools were being compared, namely, the Johns Hopkins Medical School. What was significant about the model provided by this institution was its commitment to basic science as an essential prerequisite for

-27-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Planning for the Nation's Health: A Study of Twentieth-Century Developments in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - The Topic of Health Planning 1
  • Part I - The History of Health Planning 9
  • 2 - Health Planning Proposals and Programs 11
  • 3 - The Effects of Health Planning over Time 27
  • 4 - The Rise and Decline of Professional Control 37
  • 5 - Evaluating Health Planning 51
  • Part II - The Urban HSA 73
  • 6 - The Participants' Evaluation of Success 75
  • 7 - The Emergence of Groups 87
  • 8 - The "Teeth" in the Law That Didn't Work 103
  • Part III - Summary and implications 111
  • 9 - Conclusions 113
  • Appendix 135
  • References 139
  • Index 155
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 158

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.