Public Access Television: America's Electronic Soapbox

By Laura R. Linder; Douglas Kellner | Go to book overview

no means assured. This book proposes to address the future of public access television by addressing the above areas of concern. Chapters 1 to 3 provide background information by reviewing the history, regulations, and current status of public access television. Chapter 4 explains the current funding mechanisms of public access television and provides a discussion of responses from public access television centers about their funding sources and fund raising practices. The final chapter interprets these responses in light of the history, regulations, and current status of public access television, and offers recommendations for ensuring the future of the electronic soapbox into the twenty-first century. For, as George Gerbner has said, "Those who control the stories of a culture, control the culture."25


NOTES
1.
Ben H. Bagdikian, The Media Monopoly. 5th ed. ( Boston: Beacon, 1992), ix, xiii.
2.
See, e.g., Pat Aufderheide, "150 Channels and Nothin' On", The Progressive 56 ( 1992): 36; Bagdikian, xxviii-xxx, 45; J. R. Coustel, "New Rules for Cable Television in the USA: Reducing the Market Power of Cable Operators" Telecommunications Policy ( April 1993): 205; Peter Dahlgren, Television and the Public Sphere: Citizenship, Democracy, and the Media. ( London: Sage Publications, 1995), 1-2; Ralph Engelman, Public Radio and Television in America: A Political History ( Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1996), 287-89; Douglas Kellner, Television and the Crisis of Democracy ( Boulder, CO: Westview, 1990), 80-81; and Rick Szykowny, "The Threat of Public Access: An Interview with Chris Hill and Brian Springer", The Humanist 54 ( 1994): 15-16.
3.
See, e.g., Bagdikian, 8; Dahlgren, 148; Kellner, 78-79; Michael Morgan, "Television and Democracy"in Cultural Politics in Contemporary America, ed. Ian Angus and Sut Jhally ( New York: Routledge, 1989), 252-53.
4.
See, e.g., Nicholas Garnham, "The Media and the Public Sphere" Intermedia ( January 1986): 28; Kellner, 9; James Lull, Media, Communication, Culture ( New York: Columbia University, 1995), 36; Morgan, 246; Szykowny, 15.
5.
Denver Area Education Telecommunications Consortium v. FCC, 116 S. Ct. 2374 ( 1996) No. 95-124, 132.
6.
Red Lion Broadcasting, Inc. v. FCC, 395 US 367 ( 1969). The Fairness Doctrine, first articulated by the FCC in 1949, mandated broadcasters spend a percentage of their time discussing different sides of public interest issues in their community. It was added to Section 315 of the Communication Act of 1934 in 1959 and in 1967 personal attack rules and political editorializing guidelines were added. The Fairness Doctrine was abolished by the FCC in 1985.
7.
See e.g., Bagdikian, 4; Kellner, 94.
8.
Kellner, 95.
9.
Bert Briller, "Accent on Access Television", Television Quarterly 28, no. 2 (Spring 1996): 54.
10.
Deborah George, "The Cable Communications Policy Act of 1984 and Content Regulation of Cable Television", New England Law Review 20, no. 4 ( 1984-85): 779-804; and Ralph Engelman, "The Origins of Public Access Cable Television 1966-1972" Journalism Monographs 23 ( October 1990): 1.

-xxix-

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Public Access Television: America's Electronic Soapbox
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Figures and Tables ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Notes xix
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Introduction xxiii
  • Notes xxix
  • 1 - History of Public Access Television 1
  • Notes 13
  • 2 - Making Sense of Public Access Regulations 17
  • Notes 32
  • 3 - Current Status of Public Access Television 35
  • Notes 48
  • 4 - Current Funding Sources, Techniques, and Problems 51
  • Notes 68
  • 5 - The Future of Public Access Television 71
  • Notes 81
  • Appendix 1 - Questionnaire and Data 83
  • Appendix 2 - Federal Laws Regarding Public Access Procedures and Content 105
  • Appendix 3 - Table of Cited Law Cases 119
  • Appendix 4 - Special Resources 123
  • References 127
  • Index 147
  • About the Author *
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