Public Access Television: America's Electronic Soapbox

By Laura R. Linder; Douglas Kellner | Go to book overview

regulations and court cases that have helped shape public access television over the past thirty years.


NOTES
1.
Douglas Kellner, Television and the Crisis of Democracy ( Boulder, CO: Westview, 1990), 201-2; and Ralph Engelman, Public Radio and Television in America: A Political History ( Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1996), 145-65.
2.
Quoted in Engelman, Public Radio and Television in America, 154.
3.
William Safire, written for a speech given by Vice President Spiro Agnew in San Diego, September 11, 1970, cited in William Safire, Safire's Political Dictionary ( New York: Random House, 1978),444-45.
4.
Engelman, Public Radio and Television in America, 167-68.
5.
Ralph Engelman, "The Origins of Public Access Cable Television 1966-1972", Journalism Monographs 123 ( October 1990): 4, 1; Eric Barnouw, Tube of Plenty: The Evolution ofAmerican Television ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1977), 436; Alex McNeil , Total Television: A Comprehensive Guide to Programming from 1948 to the Present ( New York: Penguin, 1984), 474.
6.
Engelman, "The Origins of Public Access Cable Television", 4; and Engelman, Public Radio and Television in America, 169.
7.
Engelman, Public Radio and Television in America, 166; Gilbert Gillespie, Public Access Cable Television in the United States and Canada ( New York: Praeger, 1975), 10, 21; John D. Hollinrake Jr., "Cable Television: Public Access and the First Amendment", Communications and the Law 9, no. 1 ( February 1987): 40.
8.
Quoted in Marita Sturken, "An Interview with George Stoney", Afterimage ( January 1984): 7; Engelman, "The Origins of Public Access Cable Television", 6-7; Gillespie, 26-29.
9.
Engelman, "The Origins of Public Access Cable Television", 12; A. William Bluem, Documentary in American Television ( New York: Hastings House, 1979), 46; Gillespie, 32-33.
10.
Engelman, Public Radio and Television in America, 226.
12.
Sturken, 7; Engelman, "The Origins of Public Access Cable Television":" 14-15; Gillespie, 34-35.
13.
Engelman, The Origins of Public Access Cable Television:" 18.
15.
Engelman, Public Radio and Television in America, 235.
16.
Quoted in Sturken, 9.
19.
Linda K. Fuller, Community Television in the United States: A Sourcebook on Public, Educational, and Governmental Access, ( Westport, CT-Greenwood Press, 1994): 145.
20.
Quoted in Engelman, "The Origins of Public Access Cable Television", 33.
21.
Engelman, "The Origins of Public Access Cable Television":" 20; Kirsten Beck, Cultivating the Wasteland: Can Cable Put the Vision back in Television? ( New York: American Council for the Arts, 1983), 113-14. See also Nicholas Johnson and Gary G. Gerlach , "The Coming Fight for Public Access":" Yale Review of Law and Social Action 2)

-13-

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Public Access Television: America's Electronic Soapbox
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Figures and Tables ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Notes xix
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Introduction xxiii
  • Notes xxix
  • 1 - History of Public Access Television 1
  • Notes 13
  • 2 - Making Sense of Public Access Regulations 17
  • Notes 32
  • 3 - Current Status of Public Access Television 35
  • Notes 48
  • 4 - Current Funding Sources, Techniques, and Problems 51
  • Notes 68
  • 5 - The Future of Public Access Television 71
  • Notes 81
  • Appendix 1 - Questionnaire and Data 83
  • Appendix 2 - Federal Laws Regarding Public Access Procedures and Content 105
  • Appendix 3 - Table of Cited Law Cases 119
  • Appendix 4 - Special Resources 123
  • References 127
  • Index 147
  • About the Author *
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