Public Access Television: America's Electronic Soapbox

By Laura R. Linder; Douglas Kellner | Go to book overview

delivery system obsolete) may affect the future of public access television, there is good reason to believe that this media service -- or something closely resembling it -- will remain vital. In fact, the great strength of public access television -- its fulfillment of the promise of democratic participation in the marketplace of ideas -- is likely to become more valued, not less. Even though information can flow much faster, and in far greater quantities, via computer, telephone, or fax, none of these modes are local and geographically communal. Of all the media, public access television still holds the greatest potential for bringing communities together and binding them in shared knowledge and experience. Local control of and participation in television is also the best protection against the homogenization of the mass media. With the concentration of control of the global media in a shrinking number of corporate hands, public access television stands as one media institution that could and should remain free and fully democratic.


NOTES
1.
Tony Schwartz, The Responsive Chord, ( Garden City, NY. Anchor, 1973), 78.
2.
Kim Klein, Fund Raising for Social Change, ( Inverness, CA: Chardon Press, 1988), 9.
3.
Doris A. Graber, Mass Media and American Politics, ( Washington, DC: CQ Press, 1993), 348-49. See also Phyllis Kaniss, The Media and the Mayor's Race, ( Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1995), 365, 370-73; and Phyllis Kaniss, Making Local News, ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991), 6-7, 221, 231.
4.
Most public access centers have an orientation meeting for people who are interested in becoming members. At these meetings, general information about public access and the specific policies and procedures of the center are discussed.
5.
Ann Kaplan, ed., Giving USA 1996, Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 1996, ( Norwalk, CT: AAFRC Trust for Philanthropy, 1997), 16-17.
6.
Klein, 26; and Michael Seltzer, Securing Your Organization's Future, ( New York: The Foundation Center, 1987), 399-456.
7.
Kids and TV: A Parents' Guide to TV Viewing, Charlotte, NC: Public Affairs Division of Cablevision, n.d., 5.
9.
Alliance for Community Media at http://www.alliancecm.org/acmacm.htm
10.
Ibid.
11.
Anita Sharpe, "Television (A Special Report): What We Watch -- Borrowed Time -- Public Access Stations Have a Problem: Cable Companies Don't Want Them Anymore", Wall Street Journal, 9 September 1994, Eastern edition, sec. R, p. 12.
12.
Bert Briller, "Accent on Access Television," Television Quarterly 28, no. 2 (Spring 1996): 58.

-81-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Public Access Television: America's Electronic Soapbox
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Figures and Tables ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Notes xix
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Introduction xxiii
  • Notes xxix
  • 1 - History of Public Access Television 1
  • Notes 13
  • 2 - Making Sense of Public Access Regulations 17
  • Notes 32
  • 3 - Current Status of Public Access Television 35
  • Notes 48
  • 4 - Current Funding Sources, Techniques, and Problems 51
  • Notes 68
  • 5 - The Future of Public Access Television 71
  • Notes 81
  • Appendix 1 - Questionnaire and Data 83
  • Appendix 2 - Federal Laws Regarding Public Access Procedures and Content 105
  • Appendix 3 - Table of Cited Law Cases 119
  • Appendix 4 - Special Resources 123
  • References 127
  • Index 147
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 156

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.