Democratization in Africa: The Theory and Dynamics of Political Transitions

By Earl Conteh-Morgan | Go to book overview

lower echelons. Besides, their decision may be tantamount to a mere imitation of unsuitable alien systems. They are reinforcing the twin factors (political liberalization and privatization) that sustain the global hierarchy of nations and their lower position in it. And in the realm of, for example, distributional justice, they may be helping to perpetuate one of the most rugged, at times insensitive, impersonal, and dangerous grand policy options even crafted by the human mind.


NOTES
1.
For details on explanation and theory building see: Johan Galtung, Theory and Methods in Social Research ( New York: Columbia University Press, 1969); and Ian Peleg, "Arms Supply to the Third World--Models and Explanations," Journal of Modern African Studies 15 ( 1): 91-103 ( 1977).
2.
Theory building as it is construed in this analysis is based on a mélange of structural constants, cycles, and systemic trends. Of course theory building varies from analyst to analyst in terms of the type of epistemology used or in terms of the approach and/or set of rules utilized in the production of knowledge and, consequently, a stipulation of what constitutes worthwhile knowledge. Epistemologies may differ not in terms of ultimate goal--the production of knowledge--but in the process or set of rules that defines the means of producing knowledge. It follows, therefore, that all epistemologies are predicated on a rationale contained in the basic set of rules or approach used in investigating a phenomenon.
3.
These assumptions are, broadly speaking, general statements of the major components of democratic governance in many countries and in particular of the Third World political environment, where the process of democratization is unfolding. Freedom and its inherent human rights, groups or civil society, and even the military, among others, are the recurring themes in most analyses of the procedural and substantive aspects of democratization. See, for example, Georg Sorensen, Democracy and Democratization ( Boulder, Col.: Westview Press, 1993); and Philip Green (ed.), Key Concepts in Critical Theory: Democracy (Atlantic Highlands, N.J.: Humanities Press, 1993).
4.
The most common form of political behavior after the legitimate normal process has been violated by the incumbent regime is usually collective political violence in the form of violent protests, riots, assassinations, and civil wars. For an examination of collective political violence from different angles see: Ted R. Gurr , Why Men Rebel ( Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1970); Charles Tilly, From Mobilization to Revolution ( Reading, Mass.: Addison- Wesley, 1978); and Chalmers Johnson, Revolutionary Change ( Boston, Mass.: Little, Brown and Co., 1966).

-180-

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Democratization in Africa: The Theory and Dynamics of Political Transitions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Introduction: Democratization as a Transitional Stage 1
  • Notes 10
  • 2 - Explaining Democratization: An Alternative to Existing Conceptualizations 13
  • Notes 30
  • 3 - Institutional Structures and Modern Authoritarianism 33
  • 4 - Independence and the Legitimization of Authoritarian Rule 53
  • Notes 70
  • 5 - Political Insecurity and the Power Political Problem 73
  • Notes 89
  • 6 - The Ethnopolitical-Democratization Conflict Nexus 93
  • Notes 114
  • 7: Military Corporate Interests and Democratization 119
  • 8 - External Imperatives: International Donors and Democratization 143
  • Notes 162
  • 9 - Conclusion 167
  • Notes 180
  • References 183
  • Index 193
  • About the Author 198
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