Black Demographic Data, 1790-1860: A Sourcebook

By Clayton E. Cramer | Go to book overview

6
INTERNATIONAL BLACK MIGRATION

The U.S. Constitution contains a curious clause that, by the ambiguity of its language, shows the embarrassment that the Philadelphia Convention felt about the continuing importation of slaves:1"The migration or importation of such persons as any of the states now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the year 1808, but a tax or duty may be imposed on such importations, not exceeding 10 dollars for each person."2 The word "slaves" would certainly have been more straightforward in this clause--and more embarrassing.

But while Congress could not prohibit importation before 1808, it did pass a number of measures before that date that regulated or prohibited other aspects of the slave trade. In 1794, Congress prohibited "carrying on the Slave Trade from the United States to any foreign place or country" though the law was "loosely drawn

____________________
1
Foner, Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men, 75-76, 84-87, describes how the early radical Republicans used the avoidance of the word "slave" in the Constitution to argue that the Framers regarded slavery as a temporary aberration, deserving of only the most limited protection.
2
U.S. Const., Art. I, § 9, cl. 1. Oddly, both the provisional and permanent Confederacy Constitutions, Art. I, § 9, cl. 1 and 2, prohibited the importation of slaves and free blacks; Du Bois, 188-189. Britain was the major naval power attempting to stop the international slave trade at the time of the Civil War. The Confederacy's desire for British assistance against the Union may be an explanation for this clause.

-51-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Black Demographic Data, 1790-1860: A Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Limitations of Census Data 1
  • 2- Emancipation 7
  • 3- Manumission 19
  • 4- Internal Immigration Restrictions 31
  • 5- Disabilities, Slave-Dumping, And The 1840 Census 43
  • 6- International Black Migration 51
  • 7- Tables & Graphs 63
  • Bibliography 155
  • Index 161
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 165

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.