Democracy and the Arts: The Role of Participation

By Terri Lynn Cornwell | Go to book overview

Increasingly, during the decade of the 1980s, scholars began to examine American cultural policies and noted the need for more analyses: "Of paramount importance in the establishment and maintenance of effective public cultural policy will be a significant improvement in the quality of information about the arts." 18 This book attempts to add a unique dimension to the body of historical-critical research integrating the arts with other aspects of society. The philosopher Kenneth Burke asserted that the arts are the highest form of communication, and I believe that much can be learned by illuminating various aspects of the relationship between this vital form of human communication and one of the world's predominant political systems.


Notes
1
Rockefeller Panel Report, The Performing Arts: Problems and Prospects ( New York: McGraw-Hill, 1965), pp. 1-2.
2
Ronald Berman, Art vs. the Arts," Commentary, Vol. 68, November 1979, p. 48.
3
Edwin Newman, Art vs. Arts," ARTS Review, Summer 1984, p. 32.
4
Phyllis Zagano, "The Federalization of Culture", Book Forum: Culture and Money, Vol. VI, No. 1, p. 80.
5
Carl Cohen, Democracy ( Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 1971), p. 7.
6
Ibid., p. 55.
7
Ibid., p. 164.
8
Ibid., p. 166.
9
Michael Straight, Twigs for an Eagle's Nest: Government and the Arts 1965-1978 ( New York: Devon Press, 1979).
10
Herbert Read, To Hell with Culture ( New York: Schocken Books, 1964), p. xi.
11
Ibid.
12
Carole Pateman, Participation and Democratic Theory ( New York: Cambridge University Press, 1970), p. 108.
13
W. D. Kay, "Arts Policy in a Democratic State", unpublished paper prepared for the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Washington, DC, 1984, p. 27.
14
Ibid.
15
William J. Baumol and William G. Bowen, Performing Arts: The Economic Dilemma ( Cambridge, MA: The M.I.T. Press, 1966), p. 4.
16
Robert A. Dahl, After the Revolution? (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1978), p. 5.

-9-

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Democracy and the Arts: The Role of Participation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - Democracy and the Arts: An American Perspective 1
  • Notes 9
  • 2 - Democratic Theory: General Considerations 11
  • Notes 28
  • 3 - Participation in the Arts: A Historical Perspective 31
  • Notes 45
  • 4 - Participatory Democracy and the Arts 49
  • Notes 76
  • 5 - Democracy and the Arts in Ancient Greece 83
  • Notes 89
  • 6 - Nineteenth-Century American Democracy and the Arts 93
  • Notes 103
  • 7 - Twentieth-Century American Democracy 107
  • Notes 119
  • 8 - Participation in the Arts: Mid-Twentieth Century America 123
  • Notes 158
  • 9 - The Role of Participation: Implications and Recommendations 165
  • Notes 185
  • Appendices 189
  • Bibliography 199
  • Index 209
  • About the Author *
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