Democracy and the Arts: The Role of Participation

By Terri Lynn Cornwell | Go to book overview

daily activities of the government, that the relationship of the arts to society seems to be recognized as positive and fundamental. The words of President John F. Kennedy reinforce that belief:

The life of the arts, far from being an interruption, a distraction, in the life of a nation, is very close to the center of a nation's purpose -- and is a test of the quality of a nation's civilization. 61

By examining how participation in cultural activities benefits society, this book was designed to take the reader down a perhaps unfamiliar path to see how the arts are close to the center of the American purpose. Clearly, exploration of that path has only begun.


Notes
1.
Dahl and Tufte, Size and Democracy, p. 65.
2.
Ibid.
3.
Mary McGrory, "Democracy", Washington Post, March 21, 1982, p. D4.
4.
C. B. Macpherson, The Life and Times of Liberal Democracy ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1980), p. 108.
5.
Numerous commemorative days, weeks, and months pass through Congress as special resolutions. In the past five years, Congress has approved National Theatre Week, National Dance Week, and National Humanities Week, among others.
6.
Danielson, "Democratic Patterns of Political Participation", p. 247.
7.
Dahl, Dilemmas, p. 181.
8.
Opponents of government support, however, have claimed that even though "free days" have been offered by various museums, attendance by the target groups is very low.
9.
Dahl, Democracy in the U.S., p. 494.
10.
Ernest Van den Haag, "Should the Government Subsidize the Arts?" Policy Review, Fall 1980, p. 67.
11.
Banfield, The Democratic Muse, p. 12.
12.
Dewey, Art as Experience, p. 327.
13.
Kingsley Amis, "Government Shouldn't Fund the Arts", New York Times, August 31, 1980. Subsidizing the individual artist often causes many problems for the government. Notable examples include the funding of a poetry anthology by the NEA which included a one-word poem, "Lighght!"; and the partial funding of a film showing a chained dog being shot ( "Killing for Art?" Washington Post, February 8, 1980). Ernest B. Furgurson said that the government should not fund

-185-

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Democracy and the Arts: The Role of Participation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - Democracy and the Arts: An American Perspective 1
  • Notes 9
  • 2 - Democratic Theory: General Considerations 11
  • Notes 28
  • 3 - Participation in the Arts: A Historical Perspective 31
  • Notes 45
  • 4 - Participatory Democracy and the Arts 49
  • Notes 76
  • 5 - Democracy and the Arts in Ancient Greece 83
  • Notes 89
  • 6 - Nineteenth-Century American Democracy and the Arts 93
  • Notes 103
  • 7 - Twentieth-Century American Democracy 107
  • Notes 119
  • 8 - Participation in the Arts: Mid-Twentieth Century America 123
  • Notes 158
  • 9 - The Role of Participation: Implications and Recommendations 165
  • Notes 185
  • Appendices 189
  • Bibliography 199
  • Index 209
  • About the Author *
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