Staying after School: At-Risk Students in a Compensatory Education Program

By Bram A. Hamovitch | Go to book overview

2 OSRP: Opportunity or Failure?

This chapter has three parts. First, I will investigate the goals of OSRP from the perspectives of the state funding agency, OSRP staff, and its students. Second, I will briefly sketch the various components of the formal curriculum, that is, the aspects of the program that are explicitly stated in documents. Finally, I will consider the success or failure of the program in relation to its own goals. This will be done in part by comparing the formal and the informal curricula, with the latter being the actual practices and experiences of the students and staff.


PROGRAM GOALS

State curriculum documents provide a formal statement of OSRP goals. They refer to the central importance of schooling to the program. OSRP students are seen as being at risk of dropping out of school, and the program is intended to be a preventative measure: "Through participation in the OSRP project, youngsters should increase their understanding of the relationship between education and a career, identify the skills needed to succeed in an occupation, increase their knowledge of a variety of potential occupations, and begin to define their personal career goals." The program only admits young people who are disadvantaged and at-risk. Students spend a year attending OSRP after school. The curriculum includes work skills, educational remediation (e.g., in literacy and numeracy), and personal and career counseling. The expected outcome of this process is improved life chances, that is, an increased likelihood of obtaining a high school diploma and going on to further education. The program aims to address the two criteria that qualify young people for entrance: their at-risk status in school and their state of poverty The belief is that OSRP represents an opportunity that will make a difference in these children's lives.

The list of program staff in Table 2.1. may help the reader to identify the various individuals mentioned in this and subsequent discussions. The names of the persons and places have been disguised to assure the confidentiality of all subjects.

-15-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Staying after School: At-Risk Students in a Compensatory Education Program
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • 1- Introduction: At-Risk Students, Schools and Compensatory Education Programs 1
  • Notes 13
  • 2- Osrp: Opportunity or Failure? 15
  • Notes 32
  • 3- A Conservative Ideology of Hope 35
  • 4- Staff Perceptions 53
  • Note 68
  • 5- Contradictory Relationships With Parents 69
  • Note 85
  • 6- Mixed Perceptions of the Schools 87
  • Notes 103
  • 7- Another Lost Opportunity 105
  • Appendix: Methods 123
  • References 127
  • Index 133
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 140

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.