Staying after School: At-Risk Students in a Compensatory Education Program

By Bram A. Hamovitch | Go to book overview

toward the students. If staff see the parents as being inadequate, then their intervention should make a positive contribution to helping the students improve themselves through better parental guidance.

In conclusion, the staff's negative stereotyping of the parents, their decision to act as substitute parents, and their conflicts with parents are related to social class and ideological factors. The program ideology requires that its adherents must at least surreptitiously seek someone to blame for the students' at-risk status. The staff selectively interpret their communications with parents, identifying them as possessing deficits that are responsible for this set of circumstances. Social class differences between staff and parents enter into this question because the former see a plethora of valid reasons for looking down on the latter. This makes the process of objectification and negative stereotyping easier for them to accomplish.

In the next chapter, I will discuss the relationship between the program, the students, their parents, and the schools. It will be argued that the program does little to set a framework within which the students can voice their opinions about the schools. Again, this is theorized as being related to ideological and social class factors within the program that serve to resist communication.


NOTE
1.
Of course, I too am an adult who related to them in a rather short-term way, by entering their lives and then leaving within a limited period of time. Perhaps they shared these thoughts with me because of the different quality of relationship that I had with them. In addition to the normal promises of confidentiality, and so forth, I held no power or authority over them and made every effort to take the time to show genuine and uncritical interest in what they were thinking about and doing in their lives.

-85-

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Staying after School: At-Risk Students in a Compensatory Education Program
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • 1- Introduction: At-Risk Students, Schools and Compensatory Education Programs 1
  • Notes 13
  • 2- Osrp: Opportunity or Failure? 15
  • Notes 32
  • 3- A Conservative Ideology of Hope 35
  • 4- Staff Perceptions 53
  • Note 68
  • 5- Contradictory Relationships With Parents 69
  • Note 85
  • 6- Mixed Perceptions of the Schools 87
  • Notes 103
  • 7- Another Lost Opportunity 105
  • Appendix: Methods 123
  • References 127
  • Index 133
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