Chapter Seven Prostitute Women and the Ideology of Work in London

Sophie Day


INTRODUCTION

Research was conducted beginning in August 1986 at the Praed Street Clinic, St. Mary's Hospital, London to look at the relationships between life-style and sexually transmitted infections in a cohort of prostitute women. Prostitution is defined as the exchange of sex for money and/or drugs. A structured questionnaire including sections on social background, work practices, past medical history, and other aspects of life-style is administered where possible on the first visit to the clinic. Subsequent interviews are focused upon a "seven-day recall," relating to the past week's sexual history. However, these later interviews are comparatively informal and unstructured. Records are kept of all interviews and 10 percent of them are taped and transcribed in full. Information collected in the structured questionnaire is checked against information collected over time and by different methods. Women are screened for common genital pathogens at every visit and serology is taken, with consent, every six months. Women are encouraged to attend regularly, ideally monthly, and the provision of appropriate services seems to have promoted re-attendance. In addition to screening and health information, participants are offered treatment for infections by a physician, counseling, and referrals to other health workers where appropriate. These services have been developed as a result of suggestions made by these women.

By the end of 1987, 7 of 112 women recruited had attended only once and had not been seen again during the last six months of the year. These women were assumed to have dropped out of the study. Eighty percent of the cohort were screened for HIV-1 together with a number of other clinic attenders. Three of 130 (2 percent) women prostitutes tested at the clinic are HIV-1

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Culture and AIDS
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Chapter One - Introduction: Culture and Aids 1
  • Chapter Two - Aids in Cultural, Historic, and Epidemiologic Context 9
  • Notes 23
  • References 24
  • Chapter Three - the Sick Role, Stigma, and Pollution: the Case of Aids 29
  • Notes 42
  • References 43
  • Chapter Four - Assessing Viral, Parasitic, and Sociocultural Cofactors Affecting Hiv-1 Transmission in Rwanda 45
  • Note 51
  • References 51
  • Chapter Five - Aids and the Pathogenesis of Metaphor 55
  • Note 64
  • References 65
  • Chapter Six - Aids and Accusation: Haiti, Haitians, and the Geography of Blame 67
  • Notes 88
  • References 89
  • Chapter Seven - Prostitute Women and the Ideology of Work in London 93
  • Notes 108
  • References 109
  • Chapter Eight Minority Women and Aids: Culture, Race, and Gender 111
  • Notes 128
  • References 131
  • Chapter Nine Language and Aids 137
  • Notes 157
  • References 158
  • Chapter Ten Aids and Obituaries: the Perpetuation of Stigma in the Press 159
  • References 168
  • Chapter Eleven Sex, Politics, and Guilt: A Study of Homophobia and the Aids Phenomenon 169
  • Note 181
  • References 181
  • Chapter Twelve Increasing the Cost of Living: Class and Exploitation in the Delivery of Social Services to Persons with Aids 183
  • Notes 198
  • References 201
  • Chapter Thirteen Postscript: Anthropology and Aids 205
  • Note 208
  • References 208
  • Index 209
  • ABOUT THE EDITOR AND CONTRIBUTORS 215
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