language background are some of these factors. What we will learn from those studies will greatly enrich the descriptive power of the profile begun here and, I am confident, will add significantly to its value.


NOTES

My thanks to Sue-Ellen Jacobs (Women's Studies and Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle), Jeanne Kleyn ( director, AIDS-IVDM Study, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, University of Washington, Seattle), Charlton Clay and Tambi Shaw (Project staff members) for encouraging me in this analysis, letting me use their interview tapes and transcripts to test and refine my claims, and for taking time to read and comment on the first draft of this text.

I also acknowledge the helpful suggestions from Brett Williams, Geoff Burkhart, Naomi Baron, and Robert Morasky ( The American University, Washington, DC), Michael Quam ( Sangamon State University, Springfield, IL), Gilbert Herdt ( University of Chicago, IL), Dana Winkler (New School for Social Research, New York City, NY), Stephen O. Murray ( San Francisco, CA), and Douglas A. Feldman ( University of Miami, FL).

1.
The examples explored in this chapter come from discussions of AIDS by speakers of American English. The uses of language and the treatment of AIDS-related themes which the examples illustrate are not necessarily unique to the United States or to any of its social segments or speech communities.
2.
I follow accepted linguistic practice here and identify the linguistic terms of interest to the discussion by underlying them within the text; hence GRID and Gay Plague in the sentence above. This allows me to distinguish between AIDS, the disease, and AIDS, one of several labels which speakers of American English use when referring to it.
3.
Grice ( 1975 and elsewhere) uses the term conversational implicature to refer to the linguistic process at issue here. Briefly described, the implicature process allows speakers to pack a large amount of meaning into a small amount of conversational space. They do this, among other means, by regularly drawing on implicitly stated references, as often as they do explicitly stated ones, through the discussion. I am aware of few topics where Grice's claims about the impact of implicature on the success of the discourse process have been so graphically displayed.
4.
The term self as used in this discussion refers to anindividual's perceptions of his or her own uniqueness, as a person, where perceptions are based on assessments of one's own actions within social and cultural context(s) on the reactions others have to one's actions, and on other social, cultural considerations. Importantly, self is not a static category but a construct, continually being shaped and modified by the individual in question.
5.
Other English verbs, in addition to caught, got, and have, can be used to make similar, verb-related distinctions in reference perspective and other points of contrast-- person of sentence subject, verb tense, and the like--have similar effects on sentence references. Unfortunately, a more detailed description of the relationship between AIDS and the English "verbs of illness" cannot be presented here.
6.
Sharing improperly cleaned needles is one of the primary ways through which the human immunodeficiency virus is transmitted among IV drug users. Obtaining detailed, first-hand descriptions of the needle-sharing process has been of great importance to the

-157-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Culture and AIDS
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Chapter One - Introduction: Culture and Aids 1
  • Chapter Two - Aids in Cultural, Historic, and Epidemiologic Context 9
  • Notes 23
  • References 24
  • Chapter Three - the Sick Role, Stigma, and Pollution: the Case of Aids 29
  • Notes 42
  • References 43
  • Chapter Four - Assessing Viral, Parasitic, and Sociocultural Cofactors Affecting Hiv-1 Transmission in Rwanda 45
  • Note 51
  • References 51
  • Chapter Five - Aids and the Pathogenesis of Metaphor 55
  • Note 64
  • References 65
  • Chapter Six - Aids and Accusation: Haiti, Haitians, and the Geography of Blame 67
  • Notes 88
  • References 89
  • Chapter Seven - Prostitute Women and the Ideology of Work in London 93
  • Notes 108
  • References 109
  • Chapter Eight Minority Women and Aids: Culture, Race, and Gender 111
  • Notes 128
  • References 131
  • Chapter Nine Language and Aids 137
  • Notes 157
  • References 158
  • Chapter Ten Aids and Obituaries: the Perpetuation of Stigma in the Press 159
  • References 168
  • Chapter Eleven Sex, Politics, and Guilt: A Study of Homophobia and the Aids Phenomenon 169
  • Note 181
  • References 181
  • Chapter Twelve Increasing the Cost of Living: Class and Exploitation in the Delivery of Social Services to Persons with Aids 183
  • Notes 198
  • References 201
  • Chapter Thirteen Postscript: Anthropology and Aids 205
  • Note 208
  • References 208
  • Index 209
  • ABOUT THE EDITOR AND CONTRIBUTORS 215
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 218

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.