Economic Law and Economic Growth: Antitrust, Regulation, and the American Growth System

By George E. Garvey; Gerald J. Garvey | Go to book overview

Epilogue ECONOMIC LAW, INDUSTRIAL POLICY, AND ECONOMIC GROWTH

Circumstances today differ radically from those that conditioned the evolution of economic law, especially during the years after World War II. Changed circumstances call for a new legislative effort. Indeed, they call for a bold rethinking of the rules of antitrust law and rate regulation.

A challenge of the 1990s will be to identify industries that need more favorable capital positions than corporate savings or the private securities markets seem likely to provide. Such industries might be targeted for capital transfusions through administered resource transfers, particularly if public subsidies seem more likely to hook them on the corporate dole than to promote industrial adaptation.

Of course, capital allocations need not always favor petitioning industries. Policymakers might also determine that the public interest requires a gradual outflow of funds from overbuilt sectors. How long would it have been desirable to prop up the buggy-whip industry in the 1920s--or, for that matter, the domestic shoe-making or cassette-recorder industries in the 1970s?

Absent fairly explicit criteria of social desirability, it is rarely obvious whether support or contraction of a given industry is the desirable line of policy. We suggest restoration and maintenance of the growth system as the overarching criterion of policy choice. Explicit Congressional acceptance of this criterion would amount to an implicit repudiation of formulaic decisionmaking, whether of the neopopulist or the neoclassical variety.

It was emphasized in Chapters 2 and 3 that oligopolistic structures are inherent in a modern industrial economy--or at least in important sectors of such an economy. What is more, oligopoly defies the kind of determinate theories of pricing that the competitive and the monopolistic models generate.1 The inability of economic theory to provide determinate solutions for a range of

-145-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic Law and Economic Growth: Antitrust, Regulation, and the American Growth System
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures and Tables ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction ANTITRUST, REGULATION, AND THE AMERICAN GROWTH SYSTEM 1
  • Notes 7
  • 1- Antebellum America: Emergence of the Growth System 13
  • Notes 26
  • 2- The Context and Functions of Modern Economic Law 33
  • Notes 52
  • 3- Neopopulism and the Image of the Atomized Market 59
  • Notes 73
  • 4- Neoclassical Price Theory and Rate Regulation 81
  • Notes 99
  • 5- The Chicago School, Antitrust, and Consumer Surplus 103
  • Notes 116
  • 6- Antitrust, Regulation, and the Field of Policy Choice 121
  • Notes 137
  • Epilogue ECONOMIC LAW, INDUSTRIAL POLICY, AND ECONOMIC GROWTH 145
  • Notes 152
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 157
  • Index 165
  • About the Authors 169
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 174

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.