Wittgenstein: Philosophy, Postmodernism, Pedagogy

By Michael Peters; James Marshall | Go to book overview

would simply say that the appropriateness of dialogue is demanded by the pedagogical style of Wittgenstein's Investigations, which has as its aim to show the fly the way out of the fly-bottle. The aim of the great educator is to teach us to think for ourselves.


NOTES

This chapter was written while Michael Peters was a Visiting Fellow at the Australian National University, Research School of Social Sciences, Political Science Program. We thank Barry Hindess for his kindness and support.

1.
The earliest and most significant cultural reading of Wittgenstein was given by Janik and Toulmin ( 1973). There have been relatively few literary readings of Wittgenstein (but see Lang, 1990 and contributors to the special edition of New Literary History, 1988). Most who adopt a literary approach tend to focus upon his aesthetics or want to extract a theory or distinctive approach to literature ( Brill, 1995; Perloff, 1992, 1996). Brill ( 1995, pp. 142-43) concludes "A reliance on the philosophy of Ludwig Wittgenstein will prove to be enormously useful to the future of literary criticism and theory (metacriticism): from issues of axiological debate . . . , to investigations into the foundational grammars of critical and literary language games; from a realization of the possibility of organic certainties which need not be hegemonic not adversely limiting in their efforts, to an acceptance of the importance of useful critical discriminations." See our chapters 1 and 9.
2.
The traditional analytic position is that there is not only a hard and fast distinction between form (or scheme) and content (logical and empirical statements), fact and value, but also between the philosopher and his or her works. This effectively rules out the significance of (auto)biography to philosophy. Yet Wittgenstein was fascinated with forms of philosophical writing (the meditation, the confession) that inserted the writer or thinker in the text or made the writer/thinker central. For instance, he was interested in the form of the confession as a philosophical form (and form of life) as it was practiced by both Saint Augustine and Leo Tolstoy. He also engaged in the practice of confession himself at least on one occasion, even after the loss of religious faith (see Monk, 1990). Justin Leiber ( 1997) presents a convincing account of Wittgenstein Investigations as an unconventional biographical narrative, and in a passage that anticipates part of my reading of the Investigations (in the final section of the paper), writes:

But dearly nonetheless Investigations is straightforwardly first person narrative: The I is coreferential with Ludwig Wittgenstein of the title page, and then some, the narrative anchor piece, like the I of Descartes' Meditations, although Wittgenstein's I easily becomes we when a general human understanding is examined. But Investigations is also second person: you are asked questions, your answers are suggested or implied and then explained, criticized, or expanded; indeed, there is even second person narration in which you are described as going through various exercises or routines. There is no book I know that is more conversational, interactive, and narrational: you almost hear your responses . . . and then find yourself caught and turned about by his reply. You want to say, how can I be having an intense conversation with a man who died many decades ago?

-189-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wittgenstein: Philosophy, Postmodernism, Pedagogy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 232

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.