Foreign Policy and Ethnic Interest Groups: American and Canadian Jews Lobby for Israel

By David Howard Goldberg | Go to book overview

will provide guides or indices to relevant facts" (in Ehrmann 1958, 297). Designing a consistent method of measurement, rather than achieving absolute consensus among the experts, is the key to measuring ethnic group influence over governmental foreign policy.


CONCLUSION

This chapter has introduced many of the issues, both theoretical and practical, to be addressed in this book. To reiterate, the objective is to compare American and Canadian Jewish lobby groups and to use that comparison as the basis upon which to analyze the phenomenon of ethnic political behavior generally.

Subsequent chapters of the book are organized in the following way: Chapter 2 will briefly outline the history, mandate, and organizational structure of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC); chapter 3 will do the same for AIPAC's Canadian counterpart, the Canada-Israel Committee (CIC). Chapters 4 and 5, respectively, analyze the political behavior, institutional dynamic, and relative influence enjoyed by the organized American and Canadian Zionist lobbies from October 1973 until December 1988. The final chapter of the book provides a detailed comparison of AIPAC and the CIC on the basis of the six criteria of analysis outlined earlier in this chapter; it concludes with some general comments concerning ethnic interest groups and ethnicity as the basis for effectively comparing political systems.


NOTES
1.
As several analysts have noted, philanthropy--rather than active immigration--has always represented the major thrust of North American Zionism. Naomi Cohen wrote, "For all practical purposes, Palestine was conceived as a refuge built by a vanguard of a few pioneering Jews, supported by the wealthy, but peopled largely by refugees. [American] Zionism affirmed a messianic goal, not unlike the messianism of the early American restorationists, but it did not exact a personal commitment to settle in Palestine" ( Cohen 1975, 11). See also the insightful comments of Irving Howe in the May/June 1989 issue of Tikkun.
2.
I am indebted to David Dewitt, director of the Center for International and Strategic Studies at York University ( Toronto), for initially suggesting this problem to me.
3.
These various factors and criteria have been accumulated through a detailed review of the relevant literature. The works of Robert H. Trice ( 1974, 1976a, 1976b, 1977b) were especially instructive in this regard.

-13-

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Foreign Policy and Ethnic Interest Groups: American and Canadian Jews Lobby for Israel
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Political Science ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - Theory and Background 1
  • Notes 13
  • 2 - The American Israel Public Affairs Committee: History, Mandate, and Organizational Structure 15
  • Notes 27
  • 3 - The Canada-Israel Committee: History, Mandate, and Organizational Structure 29
  • Notes 42
  • 4 - Aipac and U.S. Middle East Policy: October 1973- December 1988 45
  • SUMMARY 97
  • Notes 98
  • 5 - The Cic and Canadian Middle East Policy: October 1973-- December 1988 101
  • SUMMARY 156
  • Notes 157
  • 6 - Findings and Conclusions 159
  • CONCLUSIONS 168
  • Bibliography 171
  • Index 193
  • About the Author 198
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