Foreign Policy and Ethnic Interest Groups: American and Canadian Jews Lobby for Israel

By David Howard Goldberg | Go to book overview

4
AIPAC and U.S. Middle East Policy: October 1973- December 1988

THE ARAB-ISRAELI WAR OF OCTOBER 1973

Overview

In the immediate aftermath of the Egyptian-Syrian joint surprise attack on Israel on the morning of October 6, 1973, AIPAC's primary concern was to ensure congressional support for Israel ( Kenen 1981, 300; Near East Report, October 10, 1973). The morning following the attack, AIPAC director I. L. Kenen invited thirty Jewish community leaders, sympathetic politicians, and legislative assistants to his office. Operating under the assumption that Israeli forces would quickly prevail, Kenen wanted this group to draft statements urging congressional support of Israel at the end of the hostilities. Strongly worded statements of support for Israelfollowed from this and other meetings. Many of these statements drew analogies between the Arab attack on the morning of Yom Kippur and the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. They were signed by a group of influential senators, including Edward Kennedy, George McGovern, Walter Mondale, Claiborne Pell, and John Tunney ( Kenen 1981, 301; Near East Report, October 10, 1973).

It was four days into the war before the full gravity of the initial Arab advances upon Israeli positions became known. At this point, AIPAC's concern became Israel's desperate need for weapons and replacement parts, to be fulfilled by an American airlift of arms and material ( Kenen 1981, 302-3). Regardless of Jerusalem's and AIPAC's pleadings, the Nixon administration did not implement such an airlift until October 13. The reasons for the delay remain a source of conflict between Washington, AIPAC, and Jerusalem ( Kissinger 1982, 497; Quandt 1977, 171, 183-87; Spiegel 1985, 250-52).

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Foreign Policy and Ethnic Interest Groups: American and Canadian Jews Lobby for Israel
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Political Science ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - Theory and Background 1
  • Notes 13
  • 2 - The American Israel Public Affairs Committee: History, Mandate, and Organizational Structure 15
  • Notes 27
  • 3 - The Canada-Israel Committee: History, Mandate, and Organizational Structure 29
  • Notes 42
  • 4 - Aipac and U.S. Middle East Policy: October 1973- December 1988 45
  • SUMMARY 97
  • Notes 98
  • 5 - The Cic and Canadian Middle East Policy: October 1973-- December 1988 101
  • SUMMARY 156
  • Notes 157
  • 6 - Findings and Conclusions 159
  • CONCLUSIONS 168
  • Bibliography 171
  • Index 193
  • About the Author 198
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