Foreign Policy and Ethnic Interest Groups: American and Canadian Jews Lobby for Israel

By David Howard Goldberg | Go to book overview

5
The CIC and Canadian Middle East Policy: October 1973-- December 1988

THE OCTOBER 1973 WAR

Overview

The official Canadian response to the October 1973 War was typical of Canada's traditional aloofness toward the Middle East and its conflicts. In marked contrast certainly to the Americans, but also to many of its Western European allies, the Canadian government responded to the outbreak of hostilities with a discernible indifference ( Taras 1983). This indifference has been attributed to several factors. Canadians were preoccupied with a rapidly declining national economy, a minority Parliament, and all but imminent federal elections. Moreover, there was a widely held perception of Canada's limited capacity to influence events in the Middle East and an expressed desire on the part of Prime Minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau to move Canada away from traditional internationalism and toward enhanced bilateralism ( Dewitt and Kirton 1983a, 68-75, 387-98; Kirton 1978). Also contributing to the Canadian government's limited response to the Arab- Israeli War was the fact that most decision makers were convinced that Israel "would win as quick and as decisive a victory as she had done in 1967" ( Taras 1983, 306).

Parliament was not in session when the war began on October 6, 1973. No suggestion was made to cut short the prime minister's state visit to the Orient or to bring Parliament back into emergency session. When the House of Commons reconvened on October 15, the war was already into its second week. Regardless of large scale superpower intervention in the conflict, there was "no visible manifestation of crisis" among Canadian parliamentarians ( Taras 1983, 311).

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Foreign Policy and Ethnic Interest Groups: American and Canadian Jews Lobby for Israel
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Political Science ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - Theory and Background 1
  • Notes 13
  • 2 - The American Israel Public Affairs Committee: History, Mandate, and Organizational Structure 15
  • Notes 27
  • 3 - The Canada-Israel Committee: History, Mandate, and Organizational Structure 29
  • Notes 42
  • 4 - Aipac and U.S. Middle East Policy: October 1973- December 1988 45
  • SUMMARY 97
  • Notes 98
  • 5 - The Cic and Canadian Middle East Policy: October 1973-- December 1988 101
  • SUMMARY 156
  • Notes 157
  • 6 - Findings and Conclusions 159
  • CONCLUSIONS 168
  • Bibliography 171
  • Index 193
  • About the Author 198
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