The Aesthetics of Ambivalence: Rethinking Science Fiction Film in the Age of Electronic (Re)production

By Brooks Landon | Go to book overview

Several portions of this work have previously appeared elsewhere in somewhat different form. Part of the introduction was first published in the summer 1989 Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts special edition on science fiction film, which I edited. Much of the third chapter first appeared as "'There's Some of Me in You': Blade Runner and the Adaptation of Science Fiction Literature into Film," in Retrofitting Blade Runner: Issues in Ridley Scott's Blade Runner and Philip K. Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, ed. Judith B. Kerman, Popular Press, 1991. The "Fantasy and Science Fiction" section of Chapter 4 first appeared as "The Insistence of Fantasy in Contemporary Science Fiction Film" in The Shape of the Fantastic: Selected Essays from the Seventh International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, ed. Olena H. Saciuk, Greenwood Press, 1990. Copyright © 1990 by Olena H. Saciuk. The "Rock the Cosmos" section of Chapter 5 first appeared as the entry "Music and Music Video" from The New Encyclopedia of Science Fiction by James Gunn. Copyright © 1988 by Promised Land Productions, Inc. Used by permission of Viking Penguin, a division of Penguin Books USA Inc. 1988. Portions of Chapter 5 have appeared as "Cyberpunk: Future So Bright They Gotta Wear Shades" in the December 1987 issue of Cinefantastique, copyright © 1987 by Frederick S. Clark, as "Bet On It: Cyber/video/punk/performance," in Larry McCaffery pioneering summer 1988 cyberpunk issue of the Mississippi Review and as the introduction to the 1990 Easton Press edition of William Gibson Neuromancer. Another portion of this chapter was delivered as a paper, "Solos, Solitons, Info, and Invasion in SF film" at the 1988 Eaton Conference and is taken from the forthcoming book, Fights of Fancy: Armed Conflict in Science Fiction and Fantasy, edited by George E. Slusser and Eric S. Rabkin, published in 1992 by the University of Georgia Press. Reprinted by permission. Much of the final chapter first appeared as "Rethinking Science Fiction Film in the Age of Electronic (Re)Production: On a Clear Day You Can See the Horizon of Invisibility" in the fall 1990 "Film and/as Technology" issue of Post Script: Essays in Film and the Humanities, edited by J. P. Telotte. I wish to thank the editors and publishers of the above publications for permitting me to reprint my work in this book.

Passages from Screening Space: The American Science Fiction Film by Vivian Sobchack are reprinted by permission of The Continuum Publishing Company. Passages from Alien Zone: Cultural Theory and Contemporary Science Fiction Cinema are reprinted by permission of Verso. Passages from "The Cinema of Attraction: Early Film, Its Spectator and the Avant-Garde" by Tom Gunning in Wide Angle v. 8, ns. 3, 4 reprinted by permission of the Johns Hopkins University Press.

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