U.S. Intelligence: Evolution and Anatomy

By Mark M. Lowenthal | Go to book overview

9
Observations

The collapse of the Soviet satellite empire in 1989 and of the Soviet Union itself in 1991 both resulted in calls for reforming and reducing the U.S. intelligence community. The short interval between these events and the calls for reform and reduction, as well as the underlying assumption--that these changes likely decreased the need for the intelligence community--shows how closely many continued to connect the intelligence community and the cold war. Few raised the equally valid counterargument that in a world of increased uncertainty--of new power balances, greater diffusion of power, increasing weapons proliferation, and political instability in the nuclear-armed former Soviet republics--the need for reliable intelligence has not diminished at all.

Whatever its accomplishments of the past 45 years, the intelligence community must now restate reasons for its existence even as the entire national security policy community attempts to redefine the key issues for the United States. Under these circumstances, the role that the intelligence community plays in this redefinition could be crucial to its future. The community's ability to take part honestly and in a manner that is not seen as self-serving will help ensure more than just reduced survival--not necessarily an

-100-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
U.S. Intelligence: Evolution and Anatomy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword ix
  • About the Author xiii
  • Summary xv
  • I - The Evolution of U.S. Intelligence 1
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - Antecedents of the Modern U.S. Intelligence Community 6
  • 2 - The National Security Apparatus 13
  • 3 - The Age of Smith and Dulles 22
  • 4 - Intelligence and an Activist Foreign Policy 30
  • 5 - The Great Intelligence Investigation 39
  • 6 - Politicized Intelligence 47
  • 7 - A Restored" Intelligence Community" 66
  • 8 - Intelligence in the Post-Cold War World 87
  • 9 - Observations 100
  • II - The Anatomy of U.S. Intelligence 103
  • 10 - Central Coordination and Management 105
  • 11 - Intelligence Agencies and Components 116
  • 12 - Oversight Bodies 138
  • 13 - Observations 144
  • Notes 146
  • Index 169
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 178

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.