U.S. Intelligence: Evolution and Anatomy

By Mark M. Lowenthal | Go to book overview

Notes
1.
A major problem for anyone writing about US. intelligence agencies and activities is the plethora of books that have appeared since Congress's investigations in the mid- 1970s. No researcher can hope to read all that is available; indeed, the intelligence library now replicates the classic intelligence problem of "chaff" versus "wheat." Researchers and readers need to be careful and selective. See Mark M. Lowenthal, "The Intelligence Library: Quantity versus Quality," Intelligence and National Security 2, no. 2 ( April 1987). One useful recent reference work is Bruce Watson et al., eds, United States Intelligence: An Encyclopedia ( New York: Garland Publishing, Inc., 1990).
2.
Two biographies of Donovan (with overly sensational titles) are Anthony Cave Brown, The Last Hero. Wild Bill Donovan ( New York: New York Times Books, 1982), and Richard Dunlop, Donovan: America's Master Spy ( Chicago: Rand McNally, 1982). See also, the older Corey Ford book, Donovan of OSS ( Boston: Little Brown and Co., 1970). Thomas F. Troy Donovan and the CIA ( Frederick, Md.: Aletheia Books, 1981) is less straightforward biography than a discussion of Donovan's role in shaping the organization of the Office of Strategic Services and later the CIA.
3.
In intelligence parlance, this analytical error is called "mirror imaging" -- that is, projecting your own behavior onto another nation or individual.
4.
Wohlstetter's study of the intelligence aspects of Pearl

-146-

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U.S. Intelligence: Evolution and Anatomy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword ix
  • About the Author xiii
  • Summary xv
  • I - The Evolution of U.S. Intelligence 1
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - Antecedents of the Modern U.S. Intelligence Community 6
  • 2 - The National Security Apparatus 13
  • 3 - The Age of Smith and Dulles 22
  • 4 - Intelligence and an Activist Foreign Policy 30
  • 5 - The Great Intelligence Investigation 39
  • 6 - Politicized Intelligence 47
  • 7 - A Restored" Intelligence Community" 66
  • 8 - Intelligence in the Post-Cold War World 87
  • 9 - Observations 100
  • II - The Anatomy of U.S. Intelligence 103
  • 10 - Central Coordination and Management 105
  • 11 - Intelligence Agencies and Components 116
  • 12 - Oversight Bodies 138
  • 13 - Observations 144
  • Notes 146
  • Index 169
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