11 FOREIGN POLICY

INTRODUCTION

The new foreign policies of the East European states have been generally marked by a quest for security. The states that have emerged from Communism are, for the most part, weak and vulnerable. Their foreign policies have been supposedly deideologized; that is, they are no longer supposed to be based on the fundamental principles of Marxism-Leninism. Until 1989, ideology was a bond that resulted in a common foreign policy behavior by all of the members of the Warsaw pact. Foreign policy now is presumably based on the pursuit of real national interest. This in turn has stimulated ancient hatreds and disputes, as history rather than coming to an end, has shown a tragic tendency to repeat itself. Consequently, the architecture of the New Europe is one riven by real and potential conflict and turmoil. The collapse of the former Soviet Union and the deconstruction of the Warsaw Pact resulted in the creation of a power vacuum in the area. 1 Stability in the area has been threatened by the rising tide of nationalism and ethnic conflict. 2 The most prominent problems are the tragic civil war in the former Yugoslavia and the containment of the spread of ethnic conflict elsewhere.


RETURN TO EUROPE

Most East European states have followed a policy of seeking integration with Europe as a means of guaranteeing their security. This has

-153-

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Change in Eastern Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Part One - The Rise and Fall of Communism 1
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • 2 - Takeover, Stalinism, and De-Stalinization 17
  • 3 - Poland, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia: 1956-1989 31
  • Part Two - The Post-Communist Transition 71
  • 4 - Poland 73
  • 5 - Hungary 89
  • 6 - The Czech and Slovak Republics 99
  • 7 - Bulgaria 109
  • 8 - Romania 119
  • 9 - The Former Yugoslavia 133
  • 10 - Albania 145
  • 11 - Foreign Policy 153
  • 12 - Conclusion 163
  • SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY 167
  • Index 177
  • About the Author 184
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