The Social Dynamics of Self-Esteem: Theory to Therapy

By R. A. Steffenhagen; Jeff D. Burns | Go to book overview

"removed" from daily activity, but that they now become a part of life in its most profound and rewarding entirety. They have not removed themselves from reality, as some of the fakirs of India, but have brought an integration of the material and transcendental within them, so that they accept themselves; and by truly accepting themselves they can also accept others, by loving themselves they can love others, by understanding themselves they can understand others.


NOTES
1.
A real definition provides the meaning of a word and asserts something about the referent of the concept. It states in propositional form the most important characteristics of the concept, which can serve as a hypothesis for research. It functions as a definition and as a proposition.
2.
The model comprises the beginning development of self-esteem. In Hypnotic Techniques for Increasing Self-Esteem ( New York: Irvington, 1983) Chapter 5, p. 50, Steffenhagen presented an earlier model of this paradigm in which A represented ego strength; B, mental format; C, slope of the axis; D, self-acceptance; and E, selfesteem. Various percentages were assigned to these various components, presenting the first quantitative model of self-esteem within this paradigm. This was the beginning of an attempt to quantify and operationalize the concept of self-esteem, which has proven inadequate for quantification, which therefore has led to the evolution of the present model. Figure reprinted with permission.
3.
For each of the following models to be presented, we have developed a corresponding subtest of self-esteem at each level of ego -- Material/Situational, Transcendental/Construct, and the final level of Ego strength. These three subtests are compiled and presented in Appendix A.
4.
We all have a creative component within us, but too often this creativity has either been submerged in the realm of every day automatonlike behavior or has never been allowed to develop, due to our materialistic orientation to life. When a child manifests a component of "factor X" (one's psychic ability) that has been lost through a scientific-materialistic orientation to life, the parents want to immediately subdue it, because they do not understand it. They were not allowed to develop it within themselves and they see it as something not only unusual but even a possible step toward eventual psychotic behavior.

-51-

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The Social Dynamics of Self-Esteem: Theory to Therapy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Tables and Figures ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • 1 - Self-Esteem Psychology 1
  • 2 - Toward a Definition of Self-Esteem 19
  • Notes 51
  • 3 - The Self-Esteem Theory of Deviance 53
  • Notes 92
  • 4 - The Compensatory Mechanism 95
  • 5 - Self-Esteem in Modern Society 119
  • Notes 155
  • 6 - The Nature of Conflict in the Development of Personality 157
  • Notes 181
  • 7 - The Conflict Theory of Personality 183
  • Appendix A - Self-Esteem Inventory 215
  • Appendix B - Mapping Strategies for the Inventory 221
  • Appendix C - Reliability of SEI 223
  • Bibliography 227
  • Index 235
  • About the Authors 244
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