The Social Dynamics of Self-Esteem: Theory to Therapy

By R. A. Steffenhagen; Jeff D. Burns | Go to book overview

3
The Self-Esteem Theory of Deviance

In the late 1960s Steffenhagen began doing drug research on the college campus. His research was fundamentally empirical in origin, with a focus on sociodemographic and psychological correlates involved in drug use and abuse. He and his coresearcher, Dr. Christopher McAree, under the auspices of an NIMH grant, focused their research upon getting data, sociodemographic and sociological, on male and female users and nonusers on a college campus. Part of the research grant was therapy oriented and they engaged in student drug therapy over a period of years. This empirical research stimulated a theoretical interest on his part and Steffenhagen became concerned with focusing on the why of drug abuse. As a result of his association with Heinz Ansbacher, one of the foremost U.S. Adlerian psychologists, he reinterpreted his early data in an Adlerian context and found that within the Adlerian framework he was able to explain with much greater detail and clarity what previously seemed somewhat obscure. Too often empiric research, theoretic research, and therapeutic application are three totally separate and distinct areas of academic focus. As a result of his original empiric research, however, he developed a theoretical focus and became concerned with understanding and explaining drug abuse in terms

Material for Chapters 3 and 4 were adapted from R. A. Steffenhagen, "An Adlerian Approach toward a Self-Esteem Theory of Deviance: A Drug Abuse Model," Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education, 24(1) ( 1978): 1-3; and later from R. A. Steffenhagen, ed., Hypnotic techniques for Increasing Self-Esteem ( New York: Irvington, 1983), Ch. 4. Material for the section on the sociopsychological theory of deviance in Chapter 3 appeared in Deviant Behavior 5 ( 1984): 23-30, as "Self-Esteem and Anomie: An Integration of Adler and Merton as a Theory of Deviance," by R. A. Steffenhagen. Reprinted by permission.

-53-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Social Dynamics of Self-Esteem: Theory to Therapy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Tables and Figures ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • 1 - Self-Esteem Psychology 1
  • 2 - Toward a Definition of Self-Esteem 19
  • Notes 51
  • 3 - The Self-Esteem Theory of Deviance 53
  • Notes 92
  • 4 - The Compensatory Mechanism 95
  • 5 - Self-Esteem in Modern Society 119
  • Notes 155
  • 6 - The Nature of Conflict in the Development of Personality 157
  • Notes 181
  • 7 - The Conflict Theory of Personality 183
  • Appendix A - Self-Esteem Inventory 215
  • Appendix B - Mapping Strategies for the Inventory 221
  • Appendix C - Reliability of SEI 223
  • Bibliography 227
  • Index 235
  • About the Authors 244
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 245

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.