The Social Dynamics of Self-Esteem: Theory to Therapy

By R. A. Steffenhagen; Jeff D. Burns | Go to book overview

Appendix C
Reliability of SEI

Three subtests, consisting of 20 questions each, comprise the 81-item Steffenhagen / Burns Self-Esteem Inventory (SEI). Response is measured by a 5-point Likert-type scale on continuums: "Strongly Agree" to "Strongly Disagree," and "Very Often" or "Almost Never," depending on the nature of the question. Selfesteem has been defined in terms of three levels of ego: the world-immersed level of ego (situational), the transcendental level of ego (transcendental), and the egostrength level of ego. The three subtests, I, II, and III (Situational, Transcendental, and Ego Strength), are trifurcated to correspond with the operationalized concept of self-esteem introduced by Steffenhagen ( 1983) and elaborated by Steffenhagen and Burns in subsequent work. Each test measures three elements within three components of individual self-esteem at their respective levels: Test I (Situational) measures the elements of status/courage/flexibility within the components mental/ physical/ social. Test II measures success/ encouragement/ support within body/ mind/spirit. Test III measures perception/ creativity /adaptation within social interest/degree of activity/goal orientation. It was hypothesized that the degree of correlation between subtest I (situational), and subtest II (transcendental) would be the most significant when the score on subtest III (ego strength) was the highest. Results of the preliminary research were in the direction of the hypothesis ( Burns and Graper, 1985). Theoretical development of the fully operationalized concept of selfesteem postulates that individuals with low ego strength (as defined by subtest III) will have either an inappropriate shared reality orientation or an inability to integrate this orientation to develop more self-satisfying personality parameters. Therefore, when ego strength is high, there should be a corresponding correlation between the world-immersed level of ego (situation dominated), and the transcendental-level ego (which characterizes self-esteem at the internal construct level). Further, it was hypothesized that when the score on subtest III (ego strength) is low, the variability between subtest I (situational) and subtest II (transcendental) would be the greatest.

-223-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Social Dynamics of Self-Esteem: Theory to Therapy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Tables and Figures ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • 1 - Self-Esteem Psychology 1
  • 2 - Toward a Definition of Self-Esteem 19
  • Notes 51
  • 3 - The Self-Esteem Theory of Deviance 53
  • Notes 92
  • 4 - The Compensatory Mechanism 95
  • 5 - Self-Esteem in Modern Society 119
  • Notes 155
  • 6 - The Nature of Conflict in the Development of Personality 157
  • Notes 181
  • 7 - The Conflict Theory of Personality 183
  • Appendix A - Self-Esteem Inventory 215
  • Appendix B - Mapping Strategies for the Inventory 221
  • Appendix C - Reliability of SEI 223
  • Bibliography 227
  • Index 235
  • About the Authors 244
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 245

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.