Twentieth-Century Teen Culture by the Decades: A Reference Guide

By Lucy Rollin | Go to book overview

2
The 1920s

The Twenties . . . the jazz Age . . . Flaming Youth . . . these labels evoke excitement and change, fabulous wealth and wild parties, the romance of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby. They conjure up images of fashionable young men and women dancing the Charleston and drinking bathtub gin, living in the careless leisure of the moment. This was the decade when the young came into their own--when everyone wanted to be young.

But it was a decade of dramatic contrasts too. The liberal ideas of psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud disturbed the moral and religious conservatism of many citizens; the peace after World War I was marred by racial prejudice; the "noble experiment" of Prohibition against the sale of alcoholic beverages, which began as a triumph for the reformers, led countless Americans to defy the law openly; and the economic boom turned into bust. Teens were both participants in and symbols of these struggles.


POLITICS AND NATIONAL EVENTS

Although the peace following World War I was welcome, it was an uneasy one at best. America's hostile encounter with other nations had made many Americans even more leery of foreigners than before. At first they feared sabotage, especially by the Russian Bolsheviks, whose philosophy of revolution and abolition of private ownership ran exactly counter to American deals. With V. I. Lenin's triumph in Russia, his party firmly in power, and is efforts to create economic stability and greater prosperity for Russia's peasants gaining international attention, the voices of communism and an-

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Twentieth-Century Teen Culture by the Decades: A Reference Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Publication/Copyright Page iv
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - The Early Decades, 1900-1920 1
  • References 30
  • 2 - The 1920s 33
  • References 65
  • 3 - The 1930s 67
  • References 100
  • 4 - The 1940s 103
  • References 145
  • 5 - The 1950s 147
  • References 195
  • 6 - The 1960s 197
  • References 238
  • 7 - The 1970s 241
  • References 268
  • 8 - The 1980s 271
  • References 305
  • 9 - The 1990s 309
  • References 357
  • A Note on Statistics 361
  • A Note on Sources 363
  • Appendix - A Sample of. Teen-Oriented Links, to the World Wide Web 367
  • Index 371
  • About the Author 397
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 404

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.