Twentieth-Century Teen Culture by the Decades: A Reference Guide

By Lucy Rollin | Go to book overview

disguised himself as a black to spy on a rich man who treated blacks like servants. The message overall seemed to be that disparate groups needed to, and could, learn to get along with each other. At one point in these adventures, when his athletic prowess was noticed, a bystander remarks, "Wait til he's fully developed, in his twenties! He'll be even better'n Batman!" (No. 231, May 1971).

Some new characters became popular in the Seventies. Stan Lee's Spider Man, the Incredible Hulk, and DC's new offering, Swamp Thing. Both Hulk and Swamp Thing were horrific-looking creatures, transformed humans, who were "more hero than horror, and more to be pitied than feared" ( Daniels 1995, 160). Both became great favorites not only with seasoned comic readers but with the public. Swamp Thing was soon featured in a 1982 film, and Hulk had his own network television series in 1978.


REFERENCES

Allen Steve. Beloved Son: A Story of the Jesus Cults. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1982.

Bondi Victor. American Decades, 1970-1979. Detroit, Mich.: Gale Research, 1995.

Brown Dee. Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1971.

Brown Les. Les Brown's Encyclopedia of Television. Chicago: Gale Research, 1992.

Campbell Patty, Pat Davis, and Jerri Quinn. "We Got There . . . It Was Worth the Trip." In Young Adult Literature in the Seventies, ed. Jana Varlejs. Metuchen, N.J.: Scarecrow Press, 1978.

Chadwick Bruce A., and Jim B. Heaton. Statistical Handbook on Adolescents in America. Phoenix, Ariz.: Oryx, 1996.

Colbert David, ed. Eyewitness to America. New York: Pantheon, 1997.

Country Music Magazine, ed. The Comprehensive Country Music Encyclopedia. New York: Random House, 1994.

Cusick Philip A. Inside High School: The Student's World. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1973.

Dalzell Tom. Flappers 2 Rappers. American Youth Slang. Springfield, Mass.: Merriam Webster, 1996.

Daniels Les. DC Comics. Sixty Years of the World's Favorite Comic Book Heroes. Boston: Little, Brown, 1995.

Dasher Richard T. History of Rock Music. Portland, Maine: J. Weston Walsh, Publisher, 1985.

Deschin Celia S. The Teenager in a Drugged Society. New York: Richards Rosen Press, 1972.

Drew Bernard A. The 100 Most Popular Young Adult Authors. Biographical Sketches and Bibliographies. Englewood, Colo.: Libraries Unlimited, 1997.

Eble Connie. Slang and Sociability: In-Group Language Among College Students. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996.

Frith Simon. Sound Effects. New York: Pantheon, 1981.

Garrett Agnes, and Helga P. McCue, eds. Authors and Artists for Young Adults. 6 vols. Detroit: Gale Research, 1989+.

-268-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Twentieth-Century Teen Culture by the Decades: A Reference Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Publication/Copyright Page iv
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - The Early Decades, 1900-1920 1
  • References 30
  • 2 - The 1920s 33
  • References 65
  • 3 - The 1930s 67
  • References 100
  • 4 - The 1940s 103
  • References 145
  • 5 - The 1950s 147
  • References 195
  • 6 - The 1960s 197
  • References 238
  • 7 - The 1970s 241
  • References 268
  • 8 - The 1980s 271
  • References 305
  • 9 - The 1990s 309
  • References 357
  • A Note on Statistics 361
  • A Note on Sources 363
  • Appendix - A Sample of. Teen-Oriented Links, to the World Wide Web 367
  • Index 371
  • About the Author 397
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 404

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.