Fifty Southern Writers after 1900: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook

By Joseph M. Flora; Robert Bain | Go to book overview

Sidney Landman on "Jericho, Jericho, Jericho," Edward Krickel on "The Mahogany Frame," and M. E. Bradford on Alchemy. All four of these essays are in the "Andrew Lytle Issue" of Mississippi Quarterly, 23 (Fall 1970) and are reprinted in The Form Discovered. In editing the Lytle issue of Mississippi Quarterly and then culling the best of those essays plus others into The Form Discovered, M. E. Bradford has been the chief advocate of Lytle's achievement.

Relatively little has been written about the major fiction from the 1940s on, but much of that little is quite good. Robert Benson "The Progress of Hernando de Soto in Andrew Lytle's At the Moon's Inn," Georgia Review, 27 (Summer 1973), 232-44, is a good starting point for study of that novel, as is, for the next novel, Charles C. Clark "A Name for Evil: A Search for Order," Mississippi Quarterly, 23 (Fall 1970), 371-82 (both of these are in The Form Discovered as well). An excellent entering wedge for study of The Velvet Horn is Lytle's own essay on its composition, "The Working Novelist and the Mythmaking Process," collected in The Hero with the Private Parts. After that, of greatest interest are the Frenchwoman Anne Foata "La Leçon des Ténèbres: The Edenic Quest and Its Christian Solution in Andrew Lytle's The Velvet Horn"; Thomas Landess "Unity of Action in The Velvet Horn," Mississippi Quarterly, 23 (Fall 1970), 349-61 (in The Form Discovered also); and Clinton W. Trowbridge's "The Word Made Flesh: Andrew Lytle's The Velvet Horn."

Continuing to invite critical attention are the Lytle manuscript collections at Vanderbilt and the University of Florida, as well as Lytle's correspondence housed at Vanderbilt. Also of strong interest are his letters to Allen Tate, part of the Tate Papers at Princeton. These resources have as yet been little used. Indeed, systematic commentary is called for in many areas. Lytle biography, the development of Lytle's aesthetic, Lytle's uses of myth and history--these and other topics remain open to full-length scrutiny.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Works by Andrew Lytle

"The Hind Tit." I'll Take My Stand: The South and the Agrarian Tradition by "Twelve Southerners." New York: Harper and Brothers, 1930, pp. 201-45.

Bedford Forrest and His Critter Company. New York: Minton, Balch, 1931.

"Old Scratch in the Valley." Virginia Quarterly Review 8 ( April 1932): 237-46.

"The Backwoods Progression." American Review 1 ( September 1933): 409-34.

The Long Night. Indianapolis and New York: Bobbs-Merrill, 1936.

"The Small Farm Secures the State." Who Owns America? Ed. Herbert Agar and Allen Tate . Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1936, pp. 237-50.

At the Moon's Inn. Indianapolis and New York: Bobbs-Merrill, 1941.

A Name for Evil. Indianapolis and New York: Bobbs-Merrill, 1947.

The Velvet Horn. New York: McDowell-Obolensky, 1957.

A Novel, A Novella and Four Stories. New York: McDowell-Obolensky, 1958.

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Fifty Southern Writers after 1900: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction 1
  • James Agee (1909-1955) 9
  • Bibliography 19
  • A. R. Ammons (1926- ) 21
  • Bibliography 31
  • John Barth (1930- ) 33
  • Bibliography 41
  • Hamilton Basso (1904-1964) 43
  • Bibliography 52
  • Doris Betts (1932- ) 53
  • Bibliography 61
  • John Peale Bishop (1892-1944) 64
  • Bibliography 72
  • James Branch Cabell (1879-1958) 74
  • Erskine Caldwell (1903- ) 87
  • Bibliography 96
  • Truman Capote (1924-1984) 99
  • Bibliography 109
  • Donald Grady Davidson (1893-1968) 121
  • Bibliography 132
  • James Dickey (1923- ) 136
  • Bibliography 145
  • Ralph Ellison (1914- ) 147
  • Bibliography 156
  • William Faulkner (1897-1962) 158
  • Bibliography 173
  • John Gould Fletcher (1886-1950) 177
  • Bibliography 186
  • Shelby Foote (1916- ) 188
  • Bibliography 193
  • Ernest J. Gaines (1933- ) 196
  • Bibliography 204
  • Ellen Glasgow (1873-1945) 206
  • Bibliography 212
  • Caroline Gordon (1895-1981) 215
  • Bibliography 223
  • Shirley Ann Grau (1929- ) 225
  • Bibliography 233
  • Paul Green (1894-1981) 235
  • Bibliography 244
  • Lillian Hellman (1905-1984) 247
  • Bibliography 256
  • Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960) 259
  • Bibliography 269
  • Randall Jarrell (1914-1965) 270
  • Bibliography 278
  • James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938) 280
  • Bibliography 287
  • Andrew Lytle (1902- ) 290
  • Bibliography 299
  • Carson McCullers (1917-1967) 301
  • Bibliography 311
  • H. L. Mencken (1880-1956) 313
  • Bibliography 322
  • Margaret Mitchell (1900-1949) 324
  • Bibliography 331
  • Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964) 334
  • Bibliography 343
  • Walker Percy (1916- ) 345
  • Bibliography 354
  • Katherine Anne Porter (1890-1980) 356
  • William Sydney Porter [O. Henry] (1862-1910) 368
  • Bibliography 379
  • Reynolds Price (1933- ) 382
  • Bibliography 388
  • John Crowe Ransom (1888-1974) 391
  • Bibliography 398
  • Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings (1896-1953) 401
  • Bibliography 410
  • Elizabeth Madox Roberts (1881-1941) 411
  • Bibliography 420
  • Elizabeth Spencer (1921- ) 423
  • Bibliography 431
  • Jesse Stuart (1906-1984) 433
  • Bibliography 442
  • William Styron (1925- ) 444
  • Bibliography 454
  • Allen Tate (1899-1979) 457
  • Bibliography 466
  • Peter Taylor (1917- ) 469
  • Bibliography 477
  • Jean Toomer (1894-1967) 479
  • Bibliography 488
  • Anne Tyler (1941- ) 491
  • Bibliography 504
  • Robert Penn Warren (1905- ) 505
  • Bibliography 513
  • Eudora Welty (1909- ) 516
  • Bibliography 524
  • Tennessee (Thomas Lanier) Williams (1911-1983) 526
  • Bibliography 533
  • Thomas Wolfe (1900-1938) 535
  • Bibliography 542
  • Richard Wright (1908-1960) 545
  • Bibliography 557
  • Stark Young (1881-1963) 560
  • Index 573
  • Contributors 621
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