Religion and Technology: A Study in the Philosophy of Culture

By Jay Newman | Go to book overview

inspiration and encouragement needed for sustaining humanity in a postreligious world. Theologians who insist on the essential vanity of human accomplishments hardly have anything more promising to offer. Forswearing confidence in the Divine and the human: what dismal prescriptions these are for creatures trying to maintain the conviction that life is meaningful and worth living.

What then is to be believed? Practical reflections having brought us back to theoretical ones, it would appear that the most important thing to be done is to settle upon a sound world view. In a free and pluralistic society, we can expect there to be ample disagreement as to what might qualify as a sound world view. Commitment to such a world view will inevitably be a matter of personal faith, involving many subjective factors. Still, we do not have to create a world view from scratch, for we have any number of sublime cultural products to take up, some authentically inspired. These tools for building a faith may help to save us yet, from determinism, pessimism, hopelessness, and cynicism. As we apply them, work with them, and integrate them into our experience and understanding and way of life, we may be awed not only by the grace that they have brought to our lives but by the even more imposing grace represented by the freedom and creativity of those who have participated in their development and transmission as well as by the freedom and creativity that we ourselves have been able to bring to their utilization, adaptation, and enhancement. Some of us will come to believe, with Emerson, that "there is a divine Providence in the world, which will not save us but through our own cooperation."66


NOTES
1.
Alexander S. Kohanski, Philosophy and Technology: Toward a New Orientation in Modern Thinking ( New York: Philosophical Library, 1977), 178.
2.
Ibid.
3.
James K. Feibleman, "Technology as Skills," Technology and Culture 7, no. 3 ( 1966): 320.
4.
José Ortega y Gasset, "Man the Technician," in Toward a Philosophy of History, trans. not identified ( New York: W. W. Norton, 1941), 161.
5.
Richard Deitrich, "Paul Tillich and Technology: His Importance for Robust Science, Technology, and Society (STS) Education," Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 10, nos. 5 and 6 ( 1990): 279.
6.
Carl Mitcham, Thinking Through Technology: The Path between Engineering and Philosophy ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994), 1.
7.
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics1140a.
8.
Aristotle, Metaphysics 1013b.

-170-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Religion and Technology: A Study in the Philosophy of Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1- Religion and Antitechnology 1
  • Notes 31
  • 2- Technology and Techne 39
  • 3- Technology and Progress 73
  • Notes 105
  • 4- Technology as a Religious Endeavor 109
  • Notes 138
  • 5- Religion, Technology, and Culture 143
  • Notes 170
  • Bibliography 175
  • Index 187
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 200

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.