Managing Corporate Culture, Innovation, and Intrapreneurship

By Howard W. Oden | Go to book overview

Appendix
Integrated Venture Map (IVM)

The Integrated Venture Map (IVM) enables us to put all our information concerning current and past ventures into a common format to facilitate assessment. The IVM is not only useful for assessing current and past ventures but is also extremely useful in developing the venture strategy and planning new ventures. The IVM can best be understood by going through an example, that of the Cagey Computer Corporation, shown in Figure A-1.

The initial entries, shown in the first column of the IVM, provide the status of products, markets, and processes at the beginning of the map. As shown in the product section of Figure A-1, the Cagey Computer Corporation has a product line consisting of two product families: one composed of three computers (Cl, C2, and C3) and the other composed of three printers (Pl, P2, and P3). Looking at the market section, we see Cagey is marketing its products in two markets: a Consumer (C) market and an Industrial (1) market. As shown by the initial entries in the IVM in 1990, they are marketing products c1, c2, p1, and p2 in the Consumer (C) market and products c3 and p3 in the Industrial (1) market. Looking at the process section, we can see they are producing the computers (c,1 c2, and c3) in their Boston (B) plant and the printers (p1, p2, and p3) in their Hartford (H) plant.

After the initial entries in each area (each horizontal line), there will be no further entries until there is a change. Products, markets, or processes that undergo change and cause new entries are indicated by underlined bold italics on the IVM. Development efforts are indicated by dotted lines, with the type of development denoted by three-letter abbreviations, which were explained in Figure 2-1 and the ensuing discussion. For example, on line 5 in column 1991, entry (P1-COST-P11) indicates that product P1 underwent a cost reduction type of development and was replaced by the lower-priced product Pll. To

-261-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Managing Corporate Culture, Innovation, and Intrapreneurship
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 279

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.