Pioneers of Early Childhood Education: A Bio-Bibliographical Guide

By Barbara Ruth Peltzman | Go to book overview

Jean Piaget (1896-1980)
Using theoretical knowledge of biology and zoology and his postdoctoral work with Alfred Binet, Piaget developed an influential theory of how children think.Piaget's theory of intellectual development provided early childhood educators with the following: the recognition of infancy as a critical period in cognitive development; the concept that the child is an active participant in the learning process from birth; the concept that cognitive development is divided into four distinct stages through which children go in a specific sequence at their own rate which is influenced by experience and maturation; and a change in the role of the teacher from an imparter of information to a designer of activities appropriate to a child's level of development, which allows them to act on materials and develop thinking skills. His theory provided a means by which to assess children's levels of intellectual functioning, intellectual readiness, and the appropriateness of classroom activities. Piaget's theory also helped parents to become more effective by looking at children's activities to assess what verbal and manipulative behaviors mean for the child. Educators can also access the numerous publications by a growing body of experts interpreting Piaget's theory and its implications for early childhood programs.Piaget's work provided insight into how children's understanding of the world changes as they grow and what schools can do for young children. Piaget provided a new way of viewing the importance of the early years in the life of the child as the foundation for later learning.
PRIMARY SOURCES
362. The Language and Thought of the Child. Trans. Margorie Gabain. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1926, 1932. (repr.). [Le Langéage et la Pensée Chez L'Enfant 1923.] A series of studies conducted in the 1921-22 school year in Geneva on logic in children describes the development and function of language and thought from age 2 to 11. Attempts to answer: "How does the child think? How does he/she speak? What are the characteristics of the child's judgement and reasoning?"
363. Play, Dreams, and Imitation in Childhood. Trans. C. Gattegno and F. M. Hodgson . New York: W.W. Norton, 1951, 1962. (rep.) Neuchatel Paris: Delachaux et Niestle, 1945 [La Formation du Symbole Chez L'Enfant.] Presents three case histories of children from birth through the early childhood stage describing the development of imitation, play, and unconscious symbolism.

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Pioneers of Early Childhood Education: A Bio-Bibliographical Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • References x
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Bibliography xvi
  • Johann Amos Comenius (1592-1670) 1
  • John Dewey (1859-1952) 3
  • Ella Victoria Dobbs (1866-1952) 17
  • Abigail Adams Eliot (1892-1992) 21
  • Friedrich Wilhelm Froebel (1782-1852) 25
  • Arnold Lucius Gesell (1880-1961) 29
  • William Nicholas Hailmann (1836-1920) 33
  • Granville Stanley Hall (1844-1924) 41
  • William Torrey Harris (1835-1908) and Susan E. Blow (1843-1916) 47
  • Elizabeth Harrison (1849-1927) 55
  • Patty Smith Hill (1868-1946) 59
  • Amy M. Hostler (1898-1987) 63
  • Leland B. Jacobs (1907-1992) 65
  • William Heard Kilpatrick (1871-1965) 67
  • Lucy Craft Laney (1854-1933) 71
  • John Locke (1632-1704) 73
  • Emma Jacobina Christiana Marwedel (1818-1893) 75
  • Margaret Mcmillan (1860-1931) and Rachel Mcmillan (1859-1917) 77
  • Lucy Sprague Mitchell (1878-1967) 79
  • Maria Montessori (1870-1952) 83
  • Robert Owen (1771-1858) 85
  • Elizabeth Palmer Peabody (1804-1894) 87
  • Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi (1746-1827) 91
  • Jean Piaget (1896-1980) 93
  • Caroline Pratt (1867-1954) 99
  • Alice Harvey Whiting Putnam (1841-1919) 101
  • Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) 105
  • Alice Temple (1871-1946) 107
  • Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954) and the National Association of Colored Women 111
  • Edward Lee Thorndike (1874-1949) 117
  • Evangeline H. Ward (1920-1985) 121
  • Lillian Weber (1917-1994) 125
  • Lucy Wheelock (1857-1946) 129
  • Kate Douglas Wiggin (1856-1923) 133
  • Appendix - A Chronological List 135
  • Bibliography 137
  • Index 139
  • About the Author *
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