Pioneers of Early Childhood Education: A Bio-Bibliographical Guide

By Barbara Ruth Peltzman | Go to book overview

Evangeline H. Ward (1920-1985)
Ward served on the governing board of the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) longer than anyone else as a board member and as president from 1970-1974. Ward held many other distinguished positions. She was president of the U.S. National Committee of the World Organization for Early Childhood Education; executive director of Child Development Consortium; director of the Institute for Teachers of Disadvantaged Children at Temple University; chairperson of the Department of Early Childhood Education, Hampton Institute; executive director of the Nursery Foundation of St. Louis Comprehensive Day Care Service Agency; coordinator of the Department of Early Childhood Education, Temple University; director of Model Head Start Training for the U.S. Office of Economic Opportunity; director of the Office of Education; and NDEA Institute for Pennsylvania state school superintendent. In addition, she was a consultant for the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Educational Testing Service; she worked on the revision of the national teachers examination on early childhood education, the Colloquy on Black Child Development, Model Cities -- Philadelphia Program; and the Pennsylvania White House Conference on Children and Youth. Ward served as delegate to the 1976 White House Conference on Children and was a member of dozens of organizations, including the Pennsylvania Black Council on Higher Education, the British Association for the Education of Young Children, and the National Conference on Black Child Development. She was an international speaker and author. Ward helped build the foundation from which NAEYC expanded to provide national services to parents, teachers, and better opportunities for all children.
PRIMARY SOURCES
472. "A Child's First Reading Teacher: His Parents." Reading Teacher 23 ( May 1970): 756-760. Develops the idea that the first teachers in a child's life are his/her parents, who help develop the environmental experiences, skills, concepts, and feelings that he/she brings to school. This pre-reading stage is the base on which the educational system will build. Provides examples of how parents and the family help children learn from vital experiences and develop skills for reading success. Describes programs such as Head Start and Follow Through, which mandate parental involvement. Concludes that there must be a coordinated effort to recognize all influences on learning.

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Pioneers of Early Childhood Education: A Bio-Bibliographical Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • References x
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Bibliography xvi
  • Johann Amos Comenius (1592-1670) 1
  • John Dewey (1859-1952) 3
  • Ella Victoria Dobbs (1866-1952) 17
  • Abigail Adams Eliot (1892-1992) 21
  • Friedrich Wilhelm Froebel (1782-1852) 25
  • Arnold Lucius Gesell (1880-1961) 29
  • William Nicholas Hailmann (1836-1920) 33
  • Granville Stanley Hall (1844-1924) 41
  • William Torrey Harris (1835-1908) and Susan E. Blow (1843-1916) 47
  • Elizabeth Harrison (1849-1927) 55
  • Patty Smith Hill (1868-1946) 59
  • Amy M. Hostler (1898-1987) 63
  • Leland B. Jacobs (1907-1992) 65
  • William Heard Kilpatrick (1871-1965) 67
  • Lucy Craft Laney (1854-1933) 71
  • John Locke (1632-1704) 73
  • Emma Jacobina Christiana Marwedel (1818-1893) 75
  • Margaret Mcmillan (1860-1931) and Rachel Mcmillan (1859-1917) 77
  • Lucy Sprague Mitchell (1878-1967) 79
  • Maria Montessori (1870-1952) 83
  • Robert Owen (1771-1858) 85
  • Elizabeth Palmer Peabody (1804-1894) 87
  • Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi (1746-1827) 91
  • Jean Piaget (1896-1980) 93
  • Caroline Pratt (1867-1954) 99
  • Alice Harvey Whiting Putnam (1841-1919) 101
  • Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) 105
  • Alice Temple (1871-1946) 107
  • Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954) and the National Association of Colored Women 111
  • Edward Lee Thorndike (1874-1949) 117
  • Evangeline H. Ward (1920-1985) 121
  • Lillian Weber (1917-1994) 125
  • Lucy Wheelock (1857-1946) 129
  • Kate Douglas Wiggin (1856-1923) 133
  • Appendix - A Chronological List 135
  • Bibliography 137
  • Index 139
  • About the Author *
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