In Caesar's Shadow: The Life of General Robert Eichelberger

By Paul Chwialkowski | Go to book overview

services. It has been unusual for him even after successful combat to praise one orally while at the same time claiming his own glory as a fighting field soldier, a thing which he certainly was not during World War II. . . . In the words of Shakespeare, "He may have been a poor player but he has certainly been a player." This boy has certainly been a player on the stage of history. A strange character who probably wonders why he has so few friends and eternally blames the other fellow. 58

On 4 August 1948, Eichelberger boarded the U.S.S. Buckner for his return trip to the United States. Before his departure, he was saluted by a fine aerial and naval display. Over 50,000 people cheered his final journey from his office to the harbor. Both the Emperor of Japan and the U.S. Secretary of War expressed their thanks for his services. Time and Newsweek magazines covered his departure in front-page stories. It was the kind of "send-off" that Eichelberger had always dreamed of, but it was spoiled by the ungratefulness of MacArthur, the "one person who forgot to thank me and wish me well after six years of service in the Pacific!" 59


NOTES
1.
Military report, "Eighth Army Experience in Japan", (data prepared for the War Department in the spring of 1947 by the 8th Army public relations office), 1-4, included in the Eichelberger Papers.
2.
Robert Eichelberger to Emma Eichelberger, 27 August 1945, 30 August 1945, and 17 September 1945, Eichelberger Papers.
3.
In February 1946, MacArthur informed Eichelberger that Sutherland had made several unauthorized trips to Australia for the purpose of seeing his "girlfriend," and that this association, combined with "Dick's" poor health, had compromised Sutherland's ability to perform his job. MacArthur stated that, in his opinion, Sutherland had become unstable and would probably "die in an insane asylum." This proved to be an exaggeration; Sutherland's retirement years were serene and fruitful. Robert Eichelberger to Emma Eichelberger, 6 February 1946, Eichelberger Papers.
4.
Robert Eichelberger to Emma Eichelberger, 4 December 1945, 14 April 1946, and 25 May 1946, Eichelberger Papers; memorandum for General Robert Eichelberger, prepared by General Clovis Byers, no title, 4 December 1945, Eichelberger Papers.
5.
John Curtis Perry, Beneath the Eagle's Wings: Americans in Occupied Japan ( New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1980), 57-59; Robert Eichelberger to Emma Eichelberger, 17 September 1945, 30 September 1945, and 27 October 1945, Eichelberger Papers; military report, "Statements, By Lieutenant General Eichelberger," no date, 1-2, included in Eichelberger Papers.
6.
Robert Eichelberger to Emma Eichelberger, 15 September 1945, 9 October 1945, and 4 November 1945, Eichelberger Papers; Robert Eichelberger to Brig. Gen. George Honnen (Commandant of Cadets, West Point), 4 Nov. 1945, Eichelberger

-162-

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In Caesar's Shadow: The Life of General Robert Eichelberger
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Note x
  • 1 - ORIGINS OF A MILITARY CAREER 1
  • Notes 5
  • 2 - FORMATION OF A PERSONALITY 7
  • Notes 13
  • 3 - SIBERIA -- A PERSONALITY EMERGES 15
  • Notes 25
  • 4 - PATHS TO PROMOTION 29
  • Notes 39
  • 5 - PREPARATION FOR WARTIME COMMAND 43
  • Notes 54
  • 6 - BUNA -- THE PYRRHIC VICTORY 57
  • Notes 75
  • 7 - STRUGGLES FROM THE SIDELINES 81
  • Notes 91
  • 8 - HOLLANDIA AND BIAK -- VICTORY AND CONFLICT 95
  • Notes 105
  • 9 - THE PHILIPPINES -- COMPETITION WITH KRUEGER 109
  • Notes 124
  • 10 - VICTORY AND DISAPPOINTMENT 131
  • Notes 142
  • 11 - MILITARY OCCUPATION OF JAPAN 149
  • Notes 162
  • 12 - RETIREMENT -- AND TURMOIL 173
  • Notes 190
  • Conclusion 205
  • Notes 208
  • SOURCES 209
  • Index 221
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