Racism, Dissent, and Asian Americans from 1850 to the Present: A Documentary History

By Philip S. Foner; Daniel Rosenberg | Go to book overview

Copyright Acknowledgments
The editors and publisher are grateful for permission to quote from the following sources:
"Drop the Asiatic Color Bar," by editors. Copyright 1943 Christian Century Foundation. Reprinted by permission from the February 17, 1943 issue of The Christian Century.
Karl Yoneda, A Partial History of California Japanese Farm Workers, Southwest Labor Studies Conference, University of California, Berkeley, March 17-18, 1978.
The ILWU's The Dispatcher: "Poison Gas from Berlin," editorial, The Dispatcher, December 31, 1943; "Meehan Back with Report on Hawaii," The Dispatcher, June 16, 1944; "Japanese-American Sergeant Recalls Union Friendship; Asks Voting Aid," The Dispatcher, November 17, 1944; "Bridges Lauds End of Japanese Ban," The Dispatcher, December 29, 1944.
Yuri (Mary) Kochiyama, Concentration Camps USA: It Has Happened Here, American Committee for the Protection of the Foreign Born, New York, n.d.
Karl Yoneda, Ganbatte: Sixty Year Struggle of a Kibei Worker, Los Angeles, 1983. Reprinted by permission of the Asian American Studies Center, UCLA.
Asian Pacific American Commission, "Call for a Public Apology by CPUSA to WWII Evacuees of Japanese Ancestry," Dialog, January 1991.
Norman Thomas, Democracy and Japanese Americans, The Post War World Council, New York, 1942. Reprinted by permission of Evan Thomas.
Carey McWilliams, What About Our Japanese Americans?, Public Affairs Committee, Inc., 1944. Reprinted by permission of Harold Ober Associates, Inc.
Harry Honda, "George Knox Roth: He publicly tried to prevent Evacuation," Pacific Citizen, June 24, 1977, p. 1.
Chuck Fager, "Days of Infamy," In These Times, May 18-24, 1983.
"'Japanese-Americans' Fate Tied Up With That of Other Minorities,' Editor Writes," Pittsburgh Courier, July 1, 1944. Reprinted by permission of the New Pittsburgh Courier.
W. E.B. DuBois, "As the Crow Flies" (column), Amsterdam News, June 26, 1943, March 4, 1944, and June 10, 1944.
The Japanese American Incarceration: A Case for Redress, pages 23-24, by The National Committee for Redress, Japanese American Citizens League, 1976.
Edward Iwata, "U.S. Reportedly Lied to Justify Japanese Camps," San Francisco Chronicle, January 19, 1983, p. 1; John Fogarty, "Japanese Internment Called Needless, Racist," San Francisco Chronicle, February 25, 1983, p. 1. Copyright © San Francisco Chronicle. Reprinted by permission.
Julie Johnson, "President Signs Law to Redress Wartime Wrong," New York Times, August 11, 1988. Copyright © 1988 by The New York Times Company. Reprinted by permission.
Carl Morgen, "Progress Won on Road to Reparations," People's Daily World, December 13, 1989. Reprinted by permission of the People's Weekly World.

Every reasonable effort has been made to trace the owners of copyright materials in this book, but in some instances this has proven impossible. The editors and publisher will be glad to receive information leading to more complete acknowledgments in subsequent printings of the book and in the meantime extend their apologies for any omissions.

-v-

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Racism, Dissent, and Asian Americans from 1850 to the Present: A Documentary History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Law and Dissent 17
  • Part II - Statements by Public Figures and Organizations 75
  • Part III - The Views of the Clergy 131
  • Part IV - The Labor Movement 165
  • Part V - African-Americans 209
  • Part VI - Relocation and Protest 247
  • Select Bibliography 303
  • Index 309
  • About the Editors *
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