An Emily Dickinson Encyclopedia

By Jane Donahue Eberwein | Go to book overview

A

A narrow Fellow in the Grass (P986) This poem was anonymously published under the title The Snake in the 14 February 1866 Springfield Republican. Dickinson's unhappiness with editor Samuel Bowles' changes to the poem is reflected in a letter to T. W. Higginson in which she enclosed a clipping of the poem: "Lest you meet my Snake and suppose I deceive it was robbed of me -- defeated too of the third line by the punctuation. The third and fourth were one -- I had told you I did not print -- I feared you might think me ostensible" (L316). She referred to the published copy that was transformed into three eight-line stanzas in which a comma was added to the end of line 3 and "instant" substituted for "sudden" in line 4. Scholars conjecture that Susan Dickinson forwarded her own copy of the poem (received from Emily in a note) to Bowles; his surprised response to the first lines of the third stanza reportedly was, "How did that girl ever know that a boggy field wasn't good for corn?" (FF27).

"A narrow Fellow in the Grass," generally considered one of Dickinson's nature poems, has become a standard text in classrooms and anthologies. It is one of her more accessible poems by virtue of its visually precise description and its loosely narrative form, but it goes beyond her poetry, celebrating the "transport" one often experiences in nature to explore the mystery of its coldblooded, unknowable aspects. Critical attention has focused upon a number of the poem's features, including the phallic nature of the snake's description, the identification of the speaker as a "Boy" (see also P389), and the singularity of the striking final image ("Zero at the Bone --").

RECOMMENDED: FF; Poems; Rebecca Patterson, "Emily Dickinson's 'Double Tim': Masculine Identification"; Martha Nell Smith, Rowing in Eden: Rereading Emily Dickinson; Cynthia Griffin Wolff, Emily Dickinson.

Mary Jane Leach-Rudawski

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
An Emily Dickinson Encyclopedia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chronology xv
  • Abbreviations xix
  • A 1
  • B 13
  • C 38
  • D 61
  • E 92
  • F 107
  • G 122
  • H 131
  • I 154
  • J 162
  • K 169
  • L 171
  • M 188
  • N 205
  • O 218
  • P 222
  • R 243
  • S 256
  • T 279
  • U 294
  • V 296
  • W 301
  • Y 311
  • Appendix A - Fascicle Listings of Dickinson Poems 313
  • Appendix B - Major Archival Collections for Dickinson Research 339
  • Bibliography 343
  • Index of Poems Cited 361
  • General Index 371
  • About the Contributors 387
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 395

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.