An Emily Dickinson Encyclopedia

By Jane Donahue Eberwein | Go to book overview

E

EAST EUROPEAN RESPONSES TO Dickinson Interest in Dickinson's poetry is found in all East European countries (evidenced by Károlyi's and Havkova's translations of some of her poetry into Hungarian and Czech, respectively) but is particularly noticeable in Poland, where several selections of Dickinson's poems and one of her letters are now available.

Discovery of Dickinson and interest in her poetry date back to the 1960s and 1970s. Early publications included not only translations of individual poems undertaken by various poets, such as Ludmila Marjańska, Artur Miídzyrzecki, or Jan Prokop, to be found in various literary journals, but also two volumes of selected poems translated by another poet, Kazimiera Iłłakowiczówna ( 1965 and 1975). Although Iłłakowiczówna has the credit for making a wider selection of Dickinson's poetry available in Polish for the first time, she must also be held responsible for painting a largely conventional portrait of the poet as sentimental and Victorian, a poet of the past. Thus the essential modernity of Dickinson's poetry had yet to be discovered. This was done primarily by Ludmiła Marjańska in her translations of individual poems and by Stanisław Baraficzak, especially in his 1990 volume of Dickinson's poems. Baraficzak's modeling of his translations on the meter and diction of Cyprian Kamil Norwid, a highly unorthodox Polish Romantic poet, evoked a strikingly modern aura in Dickinson's poetry. However, occasional one-dimensional interpretations, elimination of some esoteric vocabulary, and overall regularity of meter and rhyme★ (particularly evident in his second volume of selected poems published in 1995) sometimes resulted in yet another taming of Dickinson.

A major recent arrival is a selection of Dickinson's letters translated and edited by Danuta Piestrzyfiska, which is the first publication of Dickinson's prose into Polish. While not always successful in handling some of the pitfalls of Dickinson's prose, this translation has generally been praised for rendering

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An Emily Dickinson Encyclopedia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chronology xv
  • Abbreviations xix
  • A 1
  • B 13
  • C 38
  • D 61
  • E 92
  • F 107
  • G 122
  • H 131
  • I 154
  • J 162
  • K 169
  • L 171
  • M 188
  • N 205
  • O 218
  • P 222
  • R 243
  • S 256
  • T 279
  • U 294
  • V 296
  • W 301
  • Y 311
  • Appendix A - Fascicle Listings of Dickinson Poems 313
  • Appendix B - Major Archival Collections for Dickinson Research 339
  • Bibliography 343
  • Index of Poems Cited 361
  • General Index 371
  • About the Contributors 387
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