An Emily Dickinson Encyclopedia

By Jane Donahue Eberwein | Go to book overview

H

HALE, EDWARD EVERETT ( 1822-1909) An influential American clergyman, social reformer, and writer, Hale became a Unitarian minister in 1842 and went on to earn a national reputation as an early advocate of the Social Gospel movement to reform society through liberal Christian principles. He was chaplain of the United States Senate from 1903 until his death. Among Hale's major works are the Ingham Papers ( 1869); In His Name ( 1873); James Russell Lowell and His Friends ( 1899); and Franklin in France (2 vols., 1888), along with two autobiographies: A New England Boyhood ( 1893) and Memories of a Hundred Years (2 vols., 1902). In 1863 the Atlantic Monthly published his most memorable story, "The Man without a Country."

Hale's contact with Emily Dickinson occurred in 1853, when Benjamin Franklin Newton died. Newton had been a law student in Edward Dickinson's office from 1847 to 1849, and Emily Dickinson wrote to Hale as his pastor to inquire about her friend's death. She wrote again to Hale in 1856. This exemplifies the poet's tendency to seek reassurance from prominent spiritual counselors on death and immortality. (See:Clark; Gladden)

RECOMMENDED: Life; Edward Everett Hale, Jr. The Life and Letters of Edward Everett Hale. Boston: Little, Brown, 1917; Jean Holloway. Edward Everett Hale, a Biography. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1956.

Peter C. Holloran

HALL, EUGENIA (b. 1864) was the daughter of George and Mary E. Montague Hall of Athens, Georgia. In 1868 Hall moved to Amherst to live with her grandfather, George Montague, who was a first cousin of Dickinson's grandfather. At the time of Hall's marriage to Franklin L. Hunt in October 1885, Dickinson sent her a short and somewhat curious note: "Will the sweet Cousin

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An Emily Dickinson Encyclopedia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chronology xv
  • Abbreviations xix
  • A 1
  • B 13
  • C 38
  • D 61
  • E 92
  • F 107
  • G 122
  • H 131
  • I 154
  • J 162
  • K 169
  • L 171
  • M 188
  • N 205
  • O 218
  • P 222
  • R 243
  • S 256
  • T 279
  • U 294
  • V 296
  • W 301
  • Y 311
  • Appendix A - Fascicle Listings of Dickinson Poems 313
  • Appendix B - Major Archival Collections for Dickinson Research 339
  • Bibliography 343
  • Index of Poems Cited 361
  • General Index 371
  • About the Contributors 387
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